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#33257 - 02/08/07 08:37 AM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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snapper Offline
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jm47, The trees aren't just going to sit there and be eaten. They will fight back. It is natures way. And G'Day.

G'Day to Charlie, citrinocristata, Jim from Oz, Elliot, gn18, CABirdMom, Mrs Linda Lumbus.

I will take some detailed photos of what I am currently feeding Snapper, as I am unable to specifically name each particular plant.

I will add them to my photobucket album and repost the link when I have done so.

#33258 - 02/08/07 10:08 AM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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gn18 Offline
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G'day snapper,

LOL. I can just imagine a cartoon version of the plants fighting.

Since some of you have other parrots and mention some flowers, I will post this link here.

http://www.landofvos.com/articles/kitchen8.html

#33259 - 02/08/07 07:32 PM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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katy girl Offline
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Snapper, we can buy eucalyptus(Spel) in Houston in March. Sometime I wonder if we haven't all been brainwashed into what we feed our birds. When I give my birds a little safflower seed they love it and there is not one seed left, just hulls. My wild birds will not touch anything that I put out there that is left over from my bird dishes. We waste so much food around here. I am just about ready to chuck the cooked food and give them raw foods with their pellets. I know you can buy all kinds of seeds at the health food store. To get a list that comes from their native land and give them some each day might be better than all of our cooked food. I am going back and look at the list and see what they have at the health food stores. My birds have gotten where they throw out what they don't like anyway and usually it is the cooked stuff I add. They will eat the raw vegetables and greens much better. I do have a bottle brush tree and they love to shred the leaves on it. It must be great to be able to see all of these birds in the wild.

#33260 - 02/08/07 07:43 PM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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katy girl Offline
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I meant to ask, since you have taken Snapper off a lot of seed that you had noticed a change in him. Is it for the better or the worse?

#33261 - 02/09/07 12:22 AM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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snapper Offline
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The noticed change in Snapper's behaviour is for the better,
He is generally quieter during the day and he is more playful. He will still land on the seed container at times and scream for some seed but he seems quite satisfied with two meals of vegies a day and fresh treats of bottlebrush, eucalyptus, grass seeds, rolled oats etc and whatever else I can get him interested in eating that would be found in the wild.
I have seen him chew on a little green grasshopper that was bought in on a branch.
I am a firm believer that the best option for Snapper is to replicate the natural diet as much as is possible. It is a slow process though, he still wont really eat the pellets. I'll keep trying. Persistance is the key to success I believe.
Also, I have given Snapper some pine needles and he loves them.

#33262 - 02/09/07 04:06 PM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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jm47 Offline
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central Iowa
Snapper, the American wild birds who died from hanging around euc trees were mostly insectivores. They got the gum on their faces trying to eat insects from gum tree flowers. And they are dying by the hundreds, because not only do they get all gummed up, which doesn't happen, apparently to Aussie birds because of the longer and larger beaks (the ones who live on and around gum trees, that is) but they also are attracted to the trees as nesting sites, because of the height and apparent safety from predators probably, and nest there, and the babies don't survive, either.
American birds help distribute seeds of the trees and shrubs in which they feed and nest, just like wild birds everywhere. The gum tree needs no such help, evidently. It has this extremely flammable sap, and seed pods or cases which have to get hot to crack open. When a fire comes along, the gum trees' bark starts to burn, the flames "climb" the bark, and the treetop explodes, sending burning seedpods and twigs everyshere, even mises away (depending on the wind, partly). New fires are started. I know you have brush fires in Australia, too, and this is part of what makes them so severe. The gum trees survive, but not much else does. There are California associations dedicated to eradicating eucalyptus trees from the state, because of the fires, mudslides, the choking out of local native vegetation, and other things, but they were brought here intentionally by folks hoping to make lots of money growing the lumber.
What is it Jerry says about humans playing God?

I won't be planting any eucalyptus in any location where they might be visited by local birds, except for my little tiel, who may crave some leaves. And I plan on being very careful to destroy any seeds, unless the plant is an annual, and then I'll save a few seeds for next year.

I've often wondered if cockatoos have a "purpose in life", above and beyond having fun, and being beautiful. Maybe it's eucalyptus control? (Just kidding. . .sort of)


Jody
#33263 - 02/10/07 05:25 PM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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citrinocristata Offline
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<img border="0" alt="[laughing]" title="" src="graemlins/laugh[1].gif" /> I wonderded about that as well, now we have the answer (just kidding)!

LOL, we already have way too many American oaks here in the Netherlands so i guess i'll plant my eucalyptus in a pot as well wink

Ellen

#33264 - 02/11/07 03:56 PM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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jm47 Offline
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central Iowa
Can't help with the oak overpopulation, Ellen. Sorry. The thing that destroys them around here is mostly the chainsaw. :rolleyes: Everything else the oak feeds, winds up planting the acorns. Walnuts are even more so: their leaves tend to discourage other things growing, even native weeds. Wish we could find something native that would slow the mulberry down; it is trying to take over the world, and although the berries are delicious, each one seems to have about 4000 seeds which are ALL viable. eek


Jody
#33265 - 04/07/07 09:06 AM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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genimac Offline
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About Snapper's diet and eucalyptus trees which was
posted in Feb.

The seeds you can purchase in CA are OK. My friend
in Louisiana got some for her Tiels and 'too. Went
down a treat. The tree takes an age to grow big but
there are branches along the way to be eaten
<img border="0" alt="[laughing]" title="" src="graemlins/laugh[1].gif" />

#33266 - 04/07/07 03:48 PM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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Janie Offline
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Fresh Eucalptus is usually available at the florist. It also dries easily. I would wash it before using. I doubt they bother spraying it with anything because the stuff keeps forever. I would be more concerned about bacteria on stems from being kept in water. Clip that part off. Eucalptus, and acacia can be grown in planting zones 8 thru 10. There may be some species of acacia that would survive in colder climes. I have grown Eucalptus from seed. The seed is often available thru Thomson & Morgan seed catalog. Catalog is free. One needs to be careful about exporting seed and plants. Exotic species issues. I have seen Eucalyptus growing in yards in Florida. I know it's used as a landscape tree in California. Eucalyptus and Acacia probably prefer a drier type of climate.

The problem here is the U2's and Mollucan's don't hail from Austrailia. They come from the rain forests of Eastern Indonesia. There diet may consist of entirely different things. With the predisposition I observe concerning the U2's cravings for fats and starches, I am sure we are missing something naturally available to them in the wild. What is the sunflower seed a substitute for exhibited by their craving's. How much dry dander does a wild cockatoo in it's natural enviornment have. I think we are missing something that links many factors together concerning behavior and diet. What is the role of the cockatoo in the structure of biodeversity. Are they seed spreaders? Are they God's way of pruning tree's? They don't seem to be insect predators like the woodpecker or purple martin's. Are they pollinator's like the hummingbird? Too many questions. Gotta get baking goodies for Easter dinner.

#33267 - 04/11/07 09:57 AM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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snapper Offline
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Janie, Unfortunately i can't answer those questions off the top of my head.
I have wondered about the link between diet and behaviour. But having only one bird and not much previous experience, I have little to compare Snapper's behaviour with... other than his previous behaviour...
In the last few days Snapper has been quite loud and seems to be paying more attention to the local cockatoo's flyover noises (screeches and screams). I imagine this to be the starts of some hormonal behaviour, and hope it passes rather than becomes the new normal.
The local council gardeners would probably say that they play a certain role in tree pruning, as the semi eaten folage left below certain trees at certain times is obvious.
Every action has a reaction.
I know nothing about mollucan's or U2's specifically as most of my research has been focused on Snapper. (Eastern long-billed Corella)
or Cacatua tenuirostris.

#33268 - 04/11/07 11:58 AM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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Tiasmom Offline
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Alberta, Canada
Canadians and Americans can get bottlebrush at www.bottlebrushstuff.com

#33269 - 04/11/07 02:08 PM Re: 'down under' food....we call it tucker.  
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jm47 Offline
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central Iowa
I think you're on the right track, about the pruning and seed-spreading functions. I tend to think of parrots in general as gardeners; they prune, grind mulch, and scatter everything. Some even seem to enjoy digging and scratching in the dirt. <img border="0" alt="[laughing]" title="" src="graemlins/laugh[1].gif" /> Or maybe they have watched for generations as humans do those things, and want to "fit in" with their present flock? But I remember reading that wild cockatoos "remodel" the trees they occupy, even for only a few minutes, and do it quite intustriously.

There is a thing sold occasionally as "craft material", called a "palm nut". It's apparently the fruit or seed pod of a tropical palm, and is often carved into buttons, beads, cameos, or other small artsy things. (There's one item on the market that's a pendant with a carved and painted parrot on it) It's also referred to as "vegetable ivory", and there are warnings to keep it dry to prevent sprouting! I wonder if one of those would sprout and grow into a tree, in some sort of container, and allow some of the bigger, non-Australian toos, as well as Amazons and maybe even macaws, to have a plant to nibble?


Jody
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