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#236281 - 08/06/11 10:26 AM can she handle it?  
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JustMe_ Offline
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belgium
hello ,
me and my daughter (she is 14) already wants a fiew years a blue gold macaw , and now we wanna get one , but now we found this site , and i'm asking myself ,, is she old enough to take care for a bird like this ( i also gonna take care of it) , but she want to learn the bird words so .. we already have 2 big parkeets for a fiew years and they are doing well . so are we able to take a macaw in our house?

#236283 - 08/06/11 12:15 PM Re: can she handle it? [Re: JustMe_]  
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BE2Cassie Offline
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Large parrots live a very long time, upwards of 70 years. Are you and your daughter prepared to change your lifestyle for basically the rest of your lives? Having large parrots living with you is like having a toddler in your lives that never grows up. No matter what you do daily you need to think about the bird first. Who will feed him in the morning, clean his cage daily, have him out for exercise and play, who will cook for him, who will put him to bed. That's just the daily, other things to think about.
As your daughter moves on in life with high school, boyfriends, college, marriage, children who will be caring for the bird. Parrots do not like children as a rule. They move too quickly and startle the bird. Every now and then you come across one that likes children. What will you daughter do if she has a baby in 10 years and the bird is too loud for the infant or it gets nippy towards the two year old that gets close to the cage?
Parrots are huge commitments not only time wise but money wise as well. A well visit at the vet will cost you at least $150 per year and more on years when blood work is done maybe $300. Finding a vet is difficult. Not all vets are able or willing to treat birds. Some folks are lucky and have avian vets close by while others may have to drive 4 or more hours one way to the office. Cost of food pellets will cost a minimum of $20 per month, birds need fresh veggies and fruit daily, cooked beans and rice, and a variety of treats. Produce, rice, fruit, beans, nuts, and treats run me at least $25 per week and I go though five pounds of pellets per month. Cassie a small cockatoo is only about a third the size of a macaw, so figure three times the cost of food per month for a macaw. Toys and perches are another huge expense. Large bird toys will cost you at least $25 per toy(if you're lucky it will last a week, perches anywhere from $15 to $40 per perch, again if your lucky they will last a couple of weeks, a large macaw cage is at least $500 for the smallest available of 4'x 3'x 6'. Do you live in your own home or an apartment, do you have close neighbors who will be irritated by noise? Macaws are VERY VERY LOUD. I have central air so my windows are never open and my neighbors have no problem hearing Cassie who isn't as loud as a macaw a block away.
Are you and your daughter prepared to spend 6 hours or more socializing and training. It's not like having a parakeet where you can put them in the cage with another parakeet and they are happy. Birds are flock creatures needing company with them constantly. A large parrot that does not receive the interaction it needs daily will be lonely, difficult to handle, will have increased behavioral issues, will scream more and may turn to plucking their feathers or mutilating their skin.
Are you prepared to be bitten? It will happen at some point, whether it is from anger or from being startled. If you consider that a macaw is able to break a Brazil nut shell with one quick snap, imagine what it can do to a finger, nose, ear. I've worked with large macaws and have seen the damage they can accidently do to people. One such case was a bird who began to slip off the keepers arm and grabbed on to stop from falling. The keeper ended up in the hospital with surgery to repair the bone, cartilage and skin damage to her hand. She has permanent damage to her hand and is no longer able to be a keeper or lift using that hand.
So in answer to your question no your daughter is not old enough for a large parrot. Thank you for coming on the site and asking before going out to purchase a large bird. If you still want to proceed with getting a large parrot why not have your daughter and you too do some volunteer work at a local rescue to see what it's like to be around these large, needy, noisy companions.
Nancy


Nancy & Cassie BE2
#236291 - 08/06/11 04:25 PM Re: can she handle it? [Re: BE2Cassie]  
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JustMe_ Offline
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belgium
ok thnx for the information C:
i shall tell her this . but are there smaller birds who also can learn to talk?

Last edited by JustMe_; 08/06/11 04:27 PM.
#236297 - 08/06/11 05:24 PM Re: can she handle it? [Re: JustMe_]  
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JustMe...I strongly second Nancy's post. It is truly YOUR responsibility and decision as your daughter will grow up and likely come and go through the late teens and early 20's. There are smaller birds who talk but please consider that all parrots, small or large, with good care live 20 to 80+ years. This is not like getting a hamster. If you can commit to self education and a few decades of dedicated care, then please do research and ADOPT a bird. Volunteering at a rescue is a great idea. You will learn skills, information and personalities. This decision is similar to that of adopting another child...maybe like adopting a special needs child from another country,lol. There are an estimated 40-50 million "pet" birds right now...possibly more birds than cats! And only an estimated 5% have the personalities, life style, income and ability to care well for these complex angels. Please beware of pet stores and breeders, they add to the issue of overpopulation and abuse. They will also tell you a load of hogwash about how "easy" birds are and how cheap. I wish you and your daughter all the best.
ps. Moluccan cockatoos and Macaws have recorded vocalizations around 130 decibels. A barking dag is about 70 decibels and a 747 jet engine airplane is around 140 decibels... I'm pretty certain I will need to add hearing aides to my shopping list one of these days! laugh Just something else to think on...


Last edited by Crzy4Brdz; 08/06/11 05:28 PM.
#236299 - 08/06/11 05:27 PM Re: can she handle it? [Re: JustMe_]  
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Anniesmom Offline
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Budgies are smaller birds and can have a large vocabulary but with all birds you can't say all will talk. You also don't have the really long lifespan in a budge and they can have amazing characters. Of course all this takes spending time with the bird and giving it love as with all birds. If you are interested do a search on the web for rescues. You will also see cockatiels that need rescuing they also have great characters but are larger birds.


Lisa
#236302 - 08/06/11 06:10 PM Re: can she handle it? [Re: Anniesmom]  
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BE2Cassie Offline
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Parakeets are listed in the Guiness Book of World Records as the most prolific talkers of all bird species. And against popular belief it's not just the males that can talk, females can also.
Nancy


Nancy & Cassie BE2
#236308 - 08/06/11 07:01 PM Re: can she handle it? [Re: BE2Cassie]  
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I'd recommend an Indian Ringneck. Here's a link with some information. Get an albino one and pretend it's a cockatoo smile


***** Please don't use links that recommend breeding and buying links.

Last edited by Charlie; 08/06/11 07:35 PM. Reason: delete link

Gem - Ducorps Cockatoo
Tweety - Budgie

#236313 - 08/06/11 08:10 PM Re: can she handle it? [Re: DucorpsGem16]  
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JustMe_ Offline
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belgium
ok thanks alot to everyone .
me and my daughter planned already to adopt one , because we rode already about the breaders.
and our parakeets don't say much , they only make the sound like a goat smile.
but we will think a fiew weeks about it and if we still wanna have one , we gonna look for a bit smaller talking bird in a rescue

#236317 - 08/06/11 09:11 PM Re: can she handle it? [Re: JustMe_]  
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BE2Cassie Offline
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If the most important thing for you is talking you shouldn't be getting a large or even a smaller bird. What will you do if you get it home and it stops talking, which it will at least for awhile. It's going to be in a new setting, new people and a whole new life. This is going to make the bird very uncomfortable. It could take a year or more before the bird feels like it's home.
I've met all sorts of birds some that talk and some that don't. African greys that are all suppose to be great talkers, aren't! I've met three that don't talk at all. I've met cockatiels, conures, senegals, lorikeets, macaws and amazon, all that don't talk. These are all suppose to be great talking birds. If talking is whats important to you and your daughter what are your plans if they don't? Will you bring it back to the rescue and try to get another one that's better? Some more to think about.
Nancy


Nancy & Cassie BE2
#236328 - 08/07/11 12:54 AM Re: can she handle it? [Re: BE2Cassie]  
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Anniesmom Offline
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I agree with BE2Cassie not every bird that is supposed to talk talks. My Annie when she tries to talk it's hardly understandable but I don't care as. I got her as part of the family and not to talk. Please re-think getting Amy bird at all if this is just what you want as you will end up being disappointed.


Lisa
#236336 - 08/07/11 03:14 AM Re: can she handle it? [Re: Anniesmom]  
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Beeps Offline
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In complete agreement with all that's been said already. Also, I don't know how much experience you have with birds, but their talking is not like having a conversation (unless your idea of a conversation is repeating "Hello" back and forth 100 times); I know some people who have been disappointed by that. I also know many people who get irritated with the constant repetition of their birds that do talk.

My birds communicate way more to me via body language, behavior, whistles, squawks, and other noises than human words.

Also, many birds that talk in front of their family/flock will not do so in front of strangers, which is something to keep in mind if you wanted to show off the bird -- there's a good chance s/he's going to clam right up!

I must also really stress the importance of the bird (should you get one) being a family bird. Birds bond strongly to their families, and can be devastated when children go off to college. If the bird has a good relationship with you, this can go more smoothly. The rescue where I volunteer gets several birds in each year that were purchased as pets for children and then surrendered when the kids move out of the house. We just go another one in last week frown

#236354 - 08/07/11 07:08 AM Re: can she handle it? [Re: Beeps]  
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Even a "talking bird" is not easy to understand. The physical equipment they use to make sounds is very different from ours, and their voices are not always easy to understand. Those who do speak understandably, vary a LOT in their ability to use the words effectively. I'm blessed to live with a very talented speaker, but I only understand about 1/4 to 1/3 of what he says. He was 15 when he came to us, and he speaks way more Yiddish than I do, for one thing! But he also mumbles, and uses words in unusual ways; sometimes I think he's making jokes. One thing he will NOT do, is "perform" by speaking on command. He will do somersaults for people's amusement, but he won't talk for that.


Jody
#236356 - 08/07/11 09:52 AM Re: can she handle it? [Re: jm47]  
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JustMe_ Offline
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belgium
if the bird don't wanna talk , it's not a reason for us to bring it back , i let my daughter read this yet and she was like , 'no; poor bird if u bring it back for that' . it just would be funny if the bird can mumble a bit .
and college in belgium is bit different , here you're home every weekend so she still can see it regulary .
and when she isn't home , i'm here to take care of the bird .


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