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#130342 - 01/27/06 10:54 PM 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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Jerry Offline
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Illegal trade in wildlife is a $6 billion dollar a year global industry that is detailed in a new report by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

In "State of the Wild 2006," the organization puts forth what they know about wildlife populations.

Number of birds imported to the United States in 2002: over 365,000.

Percentage of tropical birds that die during transport for the exotic pet trade: up to 80%

#130343 - 01/28/06 12:33 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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jm47 Offline
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That's a thousand a day, of whom 200 live through the importation. A year later, there's probably no way to find out how many survive. I hear the sound of breaking hearts, and I know why your too weeps. . . frown


Jody
#130344 - 01/28/06 12:38 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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ayres with a 2 Offline
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Well said Jody..ouch. Greed-and the search for the almighty dollar. frown

#130345 - 01/28/06 03:41 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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Everytime one of those parrots die, the smugglers try twice as hard to trap twice as many to try to recover the ones lost. frown

A vicious cycle.


~Hope~
#130346 - 01/28/06 06:46 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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Too Passionate Offline
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I could honestly talk for hours on the topic of the horrors of the illegal wildlife trade, especially the bird trade. Many of these birds are injured, when captured by poachers and shoved inside PVC pipes for transport out of their native country They are then hidden in suitcases, or placed within hidden compartments inside legal shipments, as they are exported out of their country.
The birds have no food or water, and can barely breathe as they lie in immensely, cramped quarters (sometimes for days), and most of them die in transport. (It breaks my heart to think of them, and it brings tears to my eyes as I type this.)
I have personally witnessed the atrocities of the illegal bird trade, when I went to Indonesia this past October, with the Project Bird Watch team. Our destination was Seram Island - home to the Moluccan Cockatoo. Where there was once tens of thousands of these magnificent creatures living in the rain forest several years ago, there now remains less than 5,000 of them. Local villagers told us that they would see these birds flying overhead daily, and now months could go by before they even saw a single cockatoo. Illegal poaching and logging has decimated the population. Many of the trappers, however, really do not want to poach these birds, but are force to do so, as the only means of income to feed their families. They are willing and happy to give up the smuggling, when they are provided with alternative sources of revenue, such as working as eco-tour guides.
Project Bird Watch built a rescue, and rehabilitation center in the middle of the rain forest on Seram. Kembali Bebas, meaning "Return to Freedom" is a miracle in the jungle. Authorities, after they confiscate the birds from the smugglers, turn them over to us for protection, and eventual release back into the wild. Many of the former poachers are now working there for PBW, as caregivers to the parrots. Their knowledge of these birds is enormous due to a lifetime of trapping.
I will never forget the face of one Moluccan Cockatoo in particular, who was brought to Kembali Bebas while I was there. He suffered severe head trauma and vitreous was seeping from his sad, swollen eyes. His left wing was broken, and hung limply from his side, and he shook with terror if you came within 10 feet of his quarantine cage. His poacher brutually abused him, and the image of this Cockatoo will haunt me forever. "Sad eyes", has become my totem, and is driving me more than ever to do what I can to help stop the illegal smuggling, and to ensure the success of this project.
We know that this can work, since the trapping of these parrots has stopped completely in the surrounding villages, where the poachers are now working for us.
If any of you are interested in further info, here is the link to our website. http://www.indonesian-parrot-project.org/
Lorraine Otto
CFO, Project Bird Watch

#130347 - 01/28/06 02:20 PM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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flowerchild Offline
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Quote:
Number of birds imported to the United States in 2002: over 365,000.

smuggled? legal imports were banned in 91, right?

#130348 - 01/28/06 03:38 PM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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Ringosmom Offline
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We can also help by purchasing the wild moluccanuts. My birds love them, especially Abe the moluccan. I also chop them and put them in my bird bread. This is another source of income for the people of the islands, rather than poaching.
Carole

#130349 - 01/28/06 04:20 PM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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Too Passionate Offline
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Thanks Carole.
My 2 umbies, and my goffins all love the nuts. The program employees a lot of people that would still be trapping, if it weren't for this source of income. They make more money collecting and processing the nuts, than poaching, and now have greater pride in themselves. Many of them now realize the harm that they were doing, but didn't know any better. Their fathers were trappers, and so on. Actually, one of the trappers broke down in tears one day, saying that he now, because of us, understands how wrong poaching is. He was so upset that he have done it for years, and said that he didn't know if he could ever forgive himself for hurting these birds.
Lorraine

#130350 - 01/28/06 09:45 PM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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lorraine,
thank you for the work you do. many of us ask what we can do to help. projects like yours, ecotourism... these things do the most to help protect habitat and parrots in the wild. we are unable to put them all back, but thanks to you, many will be spared the indignity of captivity, or certain death. one of our wise members said recently, if you can afford to spend a few thousand dollars on a parrot, go see them in the wild. support their local economy to ensure that poaching won't be neccessary to the surrvival of these people. once you've seen them flying free, you will never want to see one in a cage again.
AMEN.

#130351 - 01/29/06 01:31 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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Too Passionate Offline
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No matter how much we give our parrots in captivity, it can never be enough. When you see them flying free in the wild, it is an experience that I can only describe as being close to magical.

#130352 - 01/29/06 02:18 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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where did you see them too passionate? i know someone that travels to belize fairly often, and he's shown me wildlife slides that make my heart soar. i'm an avid local birdwatcher, with the houseful i have, it's almost impossible for me to travel that kind of distance at this point in my life. smile someday. where do you recommend? i know fosterparrots sponsors a program in guyana (i think,i'll have to verify that.)

#130353 - 01/29/06 02:48 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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I have the Project Bird Watch Indonesian Parrot Project "Poster" as well as the "Moluccan Calendar" hanging on the wall in my bird room. I go to this sight often, it is such an inspiration to see the work that is being done. Thanks Lorriane for all you do. I would love to get involved more somehow.
Kim

#130354 - 01/29/06 03:37 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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I saw a couple of pairs of wild Moluccans while I was hiking in the rain forest on Seram, Indonesia last October. I watched one pair preen each other tenderly, for about ten minutes, through my binoculars, before they flew away together. I also saw a lot of eclectus parrots and lories. Two female ecletus parrots soared within 15ft of me, as I was descending down a 150ft ironwood tree. We had spent the night sleeping on a platform, built near the top of the tree.
Near dusk, we saw lots of hornbills and fruit bats flying overhead. While we were lying on the platform looking up at the night sky, and a vision out of a fairytale appeared. First one tiny green light. Then a dozen. Within minutes hundreds of tiny green lights were dancing among the branches above us. "Fireflies", someone whispered. As local legend has it, "Fireflies are the freed souls of the parrots", and for short time they came and paid us a visit.
Project Bird Watch is having another eco-tour to Seram in August, and possibly a second one in October, depending on the response. If anyone is interested in going, please visit our web site for more information. http://www.indonesian-parrot-project.org/

#130355 - 01/29/06 03:56 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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Thanks Kim.
For those who want to help, but don't have a lot of extra time, becoming a member of PBW would be wonderful thing to do. If you want to get more involved on a different level, please contact the director, Dr. Stewart Metz, at parrotdoc@worldnet.att.net
Any help that you could give us, would be greatly appreciated.
Lorraine

#130356 - 01/29/06 04:25 AM Re: 365,000... minus 50 to 80%  
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There needs to be more countries that don't allow importing and exporting. I think we have more than enough birds that need good homes and far too many breeders in it for the buck shocked


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