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#126433 - 02/08/04 04:45 PM Re: Appropriate amount for adoption  
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Jerry Offline
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Ohio Valley
After quickly reading through this thread, I'll add my 2 cents:

The adoption fee must be kept relatively low. Why would someone pay a high fee for a possible "problem" bird" when they can get a hand raised for not a whole lot more from many of the breeders out there? ( Not saying that "hand raised" is a viable option.. but THEY think it is)

I personally think that the adoption fee should never exceed $300 for a large bird, no matter what it's expenses were. This is where bird clubs come in: As a club, you eat some of the expenses. That's the entire purpose of any "charity" organization. You have bake sales or other ways to raise funds in order to offset these expenses. Same goes for private rescues: Get sponsors or any other way to help offset expenses. In both cases you get as many "freebies" as possible i.e. Vet care (or reduced) food, cages etc. Many businesses are sympathetic towards rescued animals and will try to help in some way.

One of the biggest problems with rescues is that they get-in over their heads by taking in more birds than they can care for. They do this most of the time because they have a soft heart.. but in the long run the birds suffer. This is exactly the same cycle as the "old lady" stories you hear about them "rescuing" 75 cats because no one else wanted them. Real rescues will only take-in what they can afford to care for properly.

It's not a good option to take in more birds, only to find out that you cant afford your own program. You then attempt to offset this by charging outrageous prices for adoption. You're spinning your wheels by doing this and the birds continue to pile-up.

People in rescue certainly need help to meet expenses. And charging a fee certainly helps to weed-out people who.. having NOTHING in the bird is more likely to neglect the bird at some point OR... not capable of meeting the birds needs i.e. Vet bills etc. The only caveat to this rule is when a private individual decides to find his or her bird a loving home. It's much more important to a LOVING individual to find another LOVING home than to worry about the money they lost. (This is the same reason human babies are never sold.. although they might as well be, considering the expense to get one these days). To SELL your child (we're back to talking birds again) is against everything that is Holy to owners who really consider their birds to be their children. If on the other hand they consider their bird to be just a bird... there's no problem in selling. Seems that this all boils down to morals and how the owner views his or her relationship with their bird doesn't it?

How you view your bird is a personal choice and no one can second guess you or your intentions. If you are giving away or selling is no one's business. But people in the bird world have a pretty good idea of what your relationship really was depending on what road you take. Again, no one has the right to judge.. but they will have a right to their observation.

I have again gone on much too long (which is why I was going to stay out of this at the beginning) but let me end by saying:

There is a huge dividing line between selling and rescue fees. That line is starting to get a little fuzzy and I'm uncomfortable with it.

#126434 - 02/08/04 04:49 PM Re: Appropriate amount for adoption  
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Alison Offline
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Massachusetts
I understand what your saying M2mom smile . In the case of my shelter, I do provide the money for the unadoptables, If you look at my post, less than half of the money coming in is from adoption fees. I make and sell bird toys to raise money, and I sell the cages that are too small to raise money and I work hard to earn money for my shelter, but unfortunately, there is not a line of people at my door wanting to donate (and I'm not just referring to money) to a bird shelter, lets face it, most people couldn't care less about what happens to birds frown (hopefully someday that will change). As I said, I don't agree with the $800.00+ adoption fees that I have seen, but then there are those who disagree with my fees also. I don't know what the 'right' answer is. I do know that there are alot of birds in need. I'm just opening my finances for everyone to view so that they will have some sort of idea what it takes financially (not to mention emotionally and physically) to keep the doors open. Whether a bird gets adopted out and brings in some needed funding, or not, there are still bills to pay, food to buy etc. and ultimately it is my responsibility to pay them, and I do. Some people do their small part by adopting a bird or two and thats great smile , but they shouldn't compare their 'monetary' sacrifice for those one or two birds with the extreme sacrifices made by those who care for 30, 40 or more birds. Its easy for someone to say 'I take on the responsibility without any help', when they only have 2 birds. Multiply that by 30 or 40 and see if they still find it so easy (that isn't directed at anyone in particular). My point is only this, all anyone can do is try their best. Some people will applaud the efforts of those who are trying to help, while others will only seek to find fault in it no matter what. The end results are what matter most.....And as I said in chat last night...I have had awesome results with the birds that I have helped over the last 9 years. Cheers.

#126435 - 02/09/04 04:58 PM Re: Appropriate amount for adoption  
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SUNNY Offline
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Cynthia, IMHO the rescue you went to seems to have some problems w/ ethics. IMO 1) they overcharged you on a bird that was hard to place and should of been glad he was finding a home. 2) a rescue that accepts babies from breeders to SELL at INFLATED prices is doing no more than helping the breeder place babies regardless of the reason. The breeder now knows where to "dump" unsold babies, get a tax write off for the "donations" and continue producing more babies.

#126436 - 02/11/04 10:57 PM Re: Appropriate amount for adoption  
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harriet Offline
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mikey, i will stick my neck out and say that this does not bother me. my local stores sell senegals for more than $400, she gave the rescue a means of support to house many birds instead of selling the baby to a store or directly (just stating a possibility - i don't approve of selling unweaned babies), and if she did it because she was going into the hospital, doesn't sound like it will be a repeat thing. and you did not pass on a rescue bird because you had the option of a baby. jmo.

#126437 - 02/25/04 04:10 PM Re: Appropriate amount for adoption  
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NoWhere Rescue Offline
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Ft Lewis, WA
Hello,
I am very new here, but would like to add my 2 cents for just a moment.
I am one of the few lucky ones, I suppose. I run a VERY small rescue, I do not advertise, and I got into this totally by accident... smile
I started out wanting to be a large parrot owner, and of course I had absolutely NO idea of what was involved.
I started searching through rescue organizations, and found to my personal horror that there was no way to adopt a parrot without paying much more than I would going to a pet store, or a breeder.
I looked at "egads" Petsmart, and a few other places, then I looked at breeders, then I was looking at the paper in the ads.
Our local shelter does not deal with birds, and even if they had, i would not have looked there, considering they charge 200+ for dogs, and over 100 for cats. (Why? When the average person can get a dog or cat for much less by going through the ads. Even a "purebred" can be cheaper than the local adoption fees)
Anyhow, back on track.
I have been lucky enough to find an avian vet who donates his services, and finds me breaks on medicine costs, and I have some wonderful private donations.
Because I am very small, my costs are not that high now, mostly food and toy bills. I do make a lot of toys, but am not very talented in that area.
When I do take in new birds, I do make the owner turn over the cage(s) as well. that covers a lot of costs for prospective adoptive parents.
I do ask that the new parent tell me what they can afford, I do check homes and references, I do make sure that they have an avian vet lined up, but I am NOT going to charge out the wazoo to place a friend into a new home. I am willing to let anyone look over my books, so they can see what their new friend is going to possibly need from them, I keep all records of vet visits and why, so this makes it a lot easier on the new home.
To place our friends in permenant homes, we have to be willing to look outside the money. We got into this knowing that we were going to accrue and incur expenses, and we cannot expect new parents to offset all of those, and in some cases any of those. We have to look at what is best for the friend we are trying to help.

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