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#126398 - 01/17/04 12:38 AM What is a rescue - reprise  
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Sadsack Offline
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G'day.

I posted my response to the replies to my thread in "introductions" -There's no Buddy home - before looking at this board, or whatever you call it. (Down here in the Third World my internet connection is so slow and unreliable that browsing can be the equivalent of inscribing and then deciphering the Rosetta Stone!)

I would like those who contributed to the thread "What is a Rescue" to look at that post if you have time, tho' in truth you people make me feel like a child-molester at a convocation of saints.

How can you bear it? Buddy's death broke my heart. I am scared about taking on another bird in case it happens again. How can you have a badly abused bird die in your arms and then go on? How can you expose yourselves to such a dreadful catalogue of inhumanity and suffering and remain sane? I have spent many hours since Buddy's death on-line finding out the things I should have found out earlier, and some of the things I have discovered make me want to curl up in a corner and weep.

It seems to me that if you have two birds you halve the amount of time and love you can have for each, yet you people seem to be able to ignore the fundamental rules of mathematics and make one divided by twelve, twelve instead of a twelfth. How do you do that?

I have salved my conscience by making donations to animal welfare organisations yet I know in my heart I should do more and could do more. But I am frightened by the emotional cost. I am reluctant to take on just one 'rescue' for fear that I could not cope, practically and emotionally, with its problems. And, yes, that because of its problems it will not give me what *I* want. I am troubled that I am buying a bird from a breeder, and I am troubled that my reasons for wanting the bird in the first place are essentially selfish, for the enjoyment and emotional satisfaction *I* will gain from *owning* it.

Is not a big part of the pleasure we obtain from *owning* these animals the God-like status we have in regard to them.

You make me feel guilty that I am only, and in a vague sort of way, considering giving a home to just one, not too extensively damaged bird - for the worst cases are not to be found in pet-shops, obviously. Yet to go out there into the trenches.... I think I would be emotionally wrecked within days.

You humble me and, yes, you make me feel little.

Respectfully,

#126399 - 01/17/04 12:55 AM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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Lori Conarro Offline
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Welcome to our world. You have said everything I feel and I have been in tears all day over the lady who knows someone who is going to have a horrible procedure performed on a bird. Every story breaks my heart and yes I feel guilty over the fact that I bought a 14 week old baby six years ago. I have five birds, two of which are toos. The whole family works together to be sure that each bird is loved and cared for. I hope that by giving my "rescues" a home I have given back just a little. At times I am overwhelmed by all the horror stories and each one is etched in my heart. I will do what I can in my small neck of the woods and I solemnly promise to love and care for the birds that I have as long as I am able.

#126400 - 01/17/04 01:04 AM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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Greetings,
You have touched on many of the same points I struggle with everyday...but I cant write and express myself they way you do. I have decided that I would like a big bird someday and Im waiting for devine intervention, hoping when it right Ill have angels dancing and lights blinking. I understand that you have purchased a baby, and Im not going to tell you thats wrong. I guess sometimes I view a responsible / educated person, and obvously you are,
able to make a decision about whats right for themselves. You have decided to right your wrong buy learning, asking, and looking deep within yourself about whats right for you. I see nothing wrong with being honest with yourself and what your needs are. Im so glad your here, and I hope things go well with your little one. Please keep us updated.

#126401 - 01/17/04 02:54 AM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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I simply felt impelled to respond to you 'SadSack'...PLEASE if you can...take some time out here to read....so as to LEARN....simply leaving your mind OPEN to learning! That is what I have done...and "YES" I too have felt belittled at times...because I also adopted a baby Ducorps thru a breeder...BUT having only Parakeets & Cockateils all my life, I sincerely thought that is the correct thing to do...And so we did~ ONLY since I have come to this site, have I ever felt belittled or guilty! NOW, PLEASE do NOT mistake my comments here...because IF you devote some time to READ & listen...YOU WILL indeed understand the issues bird_lovers bring to the surface out here!! Purely innocent in some respect BUT yes, it can be offending & belittling at times! This you must NOT take personally immediately...Believe me, I have offered my heart...my every being to my birds, whom I dearly LOVE...and IF ever you knew the environment (home) I have designed for my birds...you may agree~ THEY ARE HAPPY ...wellPROVIDED for critters indeed! I too wish, I could offer the same to many many birds in need...BUT keep in mind....it is NOT as simple as it may be portrayed at times! I would LOVE to adopt or rescue...BUT the avenues for such were NOT obviously available, nor are they now! And even tho I am willing to offer our home(Aviary) to various birds...I feel somewhat guilty offering when I read some posts out here! Although such post may NOT be directed towards me...the other night, my heart cringed & my mind struggled with wondering IF I am right in even offering our home to a bird in need. Because , I like yourself am a bit confused after reading some postings...I do not wish to critisize anyone..I am new here...wanting to keep an OPEN mind to learn ALL I can learn~ But, honestly, I am hesitant in making ANY choice to get ANY other birds based on what I have read on this site! My decision has been to stay "NEUTRAL" & LISTEN to everyones knowledge out here which may indeed exceed my own 'for now'! However, I have NEVER regretted purchasing my Ducorps Cockatoo from a reputable breeder....TIKI is an AWESOME creature! So my friend, try NOT to feel belittled OR discouraged UNTIL you give fair time to justify such feelings~ I had better not state anymore ...for now...This place is a WONDERFUL and enriching forum for bird lovers....there is much to learn here...Keep an open mind! I wish you comfort & ease with whatever choices you may have to make for your avian interests~

#126402 - 01/17/04 04:14 AM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  

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I took in a rescue and I only have one. I can say with a fair amount of certainty that I will not take another one. He has caused more pain and emotional turmoil than I thought possible with a companion like that. There are times when I just want to give up on him, but then he has also tought me how to be humble and how to be as patient as I am capable of being. He has tought me character and courage and shown me that I can stretch my limit endlessly. I am amazed when I see the courage this little creature has. He recently started going outside to a new place in our garden. It's new to him, you see, because he was locked in a cage for 10 years. Afraid and cautious he sometimes stumbles, but he never gives up. Now he has his own tree in the yard. He is re-learning how to be in a relationship with a human. To experience the times that he, despite previous experiences, knows you wont hurt him and that he can trust you, is something I can't describe. I can't even imagine the day Ollie dies. But, if he goes before I do, I will know that he at least was given the opportunity to experience a life he wouldn't have if we hadn't met.

#126403 - 01/17/04 04:46 AM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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sadsack,
I read a statement by an avian behaviorist (I think Sally Blanchard or Chris Davis, but not really sure.) It stated that unwanted parrots are EVERYONE'S problem that love these animals. This really resonated within me when I read it. This is why WE took in a neglect/abuse case and that's why we will do it again.

We have two birds and yes the more you have the less one on one attention you can give them, but then sometimes they bond in their own special way and become companions - and after a while birds become your life. We have no social life... instead we come home to our two greatest friends (and eachother) we haven't really cut down on the amount of time we spend with our first bird... instead we gave up our other lifestyle and became home bodies.

It's natural not to want to re-live the pain that we feel when we lose something we love. It's up to the individual to determine if they can go through that again... some can some can't. There's no reason to feel guilty for being honest with yourself.

Selfish? you could call it that and many do... but many of us have birds that don't love us back... they bite and scream or cower in abject fear. It's a feeling of responsibility for the things that man has done to them. Once again some can and some can't - our Charlie is a phobic and may never fully trust a human again. That's something that wounds me because I would never harm her but something that I understand. Given her background I wouldn't trust me either. It wouldn't help a bird if you "rescued" it and couldn't deal with the emotional strain and had to re-home it again. Bottom line... re-homing a bird is SERIOUS and I'm glad that people look deep within themselves before doing it. If I knew then (when I first met Charlie) what I know now about her I probably would have walked away simply because at the time I WASN'T emotionally strong enough... but I GREW into it and now wouldn't give her up for anything. As for real "rescues" the professional ones... I don't have any idea how they deal with it... I would be at my wits end.

#126404 - 01/17/04 11:57 AM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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Sadsack Offline
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Hey, whoa. There have been hares started and arrows fired in this thread which were never part of my intention.

To those to whom the original post was addressed, mea culpa. I should never have said that *you* make me feel guilty. *I* make me feel guilty, by measuring myself against your example and finding that I fall short. At this moment in time. But you have given me an example, and shown what can be done. It is up to me, up to each of us, to decide how much of what can be done, can be done by us. I will never be able to run a sub-four minute mile, paint a masterpiece in oils, solve Fermat's last theorem, and I don't feel guilty about that. But the fact I will never paint a masterpiece in oils should not have stopped me at least learning how to daub, as it did! So I ought to feel guilty about that.

Yes, you do make me feel little - but that is a million miles from saying that you belittle me. Spirits like Florence Nightingale, Mother Theresa, St. Francis, The Buddha, Jesus Christ, should make us all feel little but I'm perfectly sure not a single one of them ever belittled anybody. It's only when you feel little that you know you ought to grow.

Lori Connaro: Surely your reply goes to the nub of it - " I will do what I can in my small neck of the woods and I solemnly promise to love and care for the birds that I have as long as I am able." What more could any of us do? It is deciding what you can do and what is unrealistic, that is the problem.

Liviray: I, personally, have no faith in divine intervention. I believe you have to make things happen for yourself. Still, I hope the lights do flash for you one day. Nor would I go so far as to say that what I am doing in buying a youngster from a breeder is *wrong*. A family with young children would, in my view, be *wrong* in taking on a troubled bird, while buying a beautiful young bird from a breeder for the children to love and care for and interact with might be very *right*. What might happen to the bird I have chosen if I now say I don't want it? I do feel that for me, at this time and in these circumstances it is arguably wrong for me to buy a young bird - and I probably wouldn't be had I been able to find a bird to 'rescue' in the hours following Buddy's death - but that is the problem my conscience is wrestling with, and is a long way from saying it is always wrong in any circumstance.

MsSmurfy: I'm newer to this site than you, but if anyone has deliberately tried to make you feel guilty or belittled you here I'm out of it. Reading between the lines I suspect someone does not agree with the way you are keeping your birds and has told you so. Well, if you have followed your own advice, listened and considered what they had to say and then decided on a course of action no-one but no-one has the right to condemn you for it, for you are the one who ultimately has to live with it. We all have the right to disagree, and say so with our reasons, but only you know your birds, your circumstances and your abilies. We are none of us omnipotent.

Karen&Ollie: Yes, we once reached the stage of wondering how we could get rid of Buddy. More than once I wished he would fall off his perch. Yet when he did, oh how it hurt, and how I wish I could get him back. It is the memory of those early days that make me chary about taking on a 'rescue', as in truth I don't think Buddy was all that bad, really. Yet I can also understand - "To experience the times that he, despite previous experiences, knows you wont hurt him and that he can trust you, is something I can't describe," - yet how can you experience that without experiencing the other?

littlecharlietoo: I cannot agree with the avian behaviourist you quote. To me this is too much like saying all Germans are responsible for the concentration camps, all Americans are responsible for the bombing of Baghdad, all Moslems are responsible for 9/11. We can only be responsible for what we ourselves do. And how can you say that you weren't emotionally strong enough to take on Charlie when, from your story, its clear that you were? You had to find out that you were and that clearly took some pain, but growing often is painful.

Yet the suggestion that "unwanted parrots are EVERYONE'S problem that love these animals" is surely nothing but emotional blackmail. Is an 8-year-old in England with her first budgie to be responsible for neglected mollucans in California? Should an 80-year-old widow in a retirement home in New York State with the Rosie than outlived her husband lose sleep over abused sulphur-cresteds in Sydney? Are we saying here that we cannot claim to love these animals unless we prove it by inflicting pain on ourselves?
To me that's masochism verging on martydom.

To pick up and endorse Liviray's point, surely we must be honest with ourselves and decide for ourselves what we can do for unwanted parrots and if it isn't very much, even if it isn't anything at all, we must certainly not load ourselves with guilt because we aren't doing more, as long as we are doing what we have honestly decided we can.

My problem, and the reason I decided to kick this topic off, is that I don't yet know where that point is for me. MsSmurfy and Karen&Ollie seem to be diametrically opposed - the one is clearly passionate about the critters, wants to provide a home for one and could, but for reasons I don't understand can't, while the other did, went through hell and yet emerged a better person and gave a fellow creature "the opportunity to experience a life he wouldn't have if we hadn't met" which, surely, is the most magnificent thing anyone can do with their life.

Ah, me! I feel that, like Omar Khayyam, I am like to hear great argument but evermore come out by that same door as in I went. Yet one can leave an art-gallery, cinema or theatre by the same door as you entered it, but with your life changed by what you saw within. Perhaps dear old Jimminy Cricket had the truth of it. "Always let your conscience be your guide."

#126405 - 01/17/04 02:09 PM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  

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Sadsack,

As I read your most recent post, I was thinking about how I would have replied if Ollie was no longer here. I think I would answer differntly than I did here above. I can only imagine that I would feel very vulnerable and afraid to open my heart again after the pain of loosing Ollie. You are right, you can't experience the joy without the pain with these guys--and you shouldn't. The "other" is there, and I'm built in such a way that I prefer not to ignore it. The "other" is what has happened as a result of human greed, and I don't ever want to forget that because it keeps me humble. When you take the risk to experience great love, or whatever you want to call it, you also risk feeling a plethora of other things on the other end of the continuum. One of lifes biggest dilemmas is figuring out how to duck from that other end.

Don't feel small, feel big. You have done more than most. Don't worry about the arrows. They have a rubber head. wink

#126406 - 01/17/04 03:44 PM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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Sadsack,
Please remember that not ALL birds in rescues are (for lack of a better word) "nuts". Many are given up because a person falls ill, dies, is moving, etc. Not all emotional problems that the birds have are violent; they may be cage bound, they may be pluckers, they may be screamers. Taking in a repressed or "damaged" bird has been one of the most fulfilling parts of my life. They are like watch a rose open from a bud into the most exquisite bloom you ever saw. Their petals may open slowly but the reward of the bloom is well worth it. I have cried from sheer joy the 1st time some of my birds have had a "1st"...may it be step-up, play w/ a toy, not bite when I have gone to feed, etc. I do not look at having my parrots as "being their God" because frankly they are closer to being my God. They in most ways rule MY life.

As for having more than one bird you can equal it to having more than 1 child (better yet if you equal it to twins, triplets, quadruplets, etc laugh ). If people can love more than 1 child the ability to love and care for more than 1 bird may also be there. I do not work so I DO have the time for multiple birds. When you have more than 1 bird there may be less 1 on 1 time but they also have each other for company; all my birds sit and chatter back and forth w/ each other. All my birds not only get 1 on 1 play but also group play, and I often think that they like the group play better.When I say group play THEY are not playing w/ each other but me playing w/ them as a group. Its a time I put on music and dance, clap sing, and scream w/ them all. I take each one and "dance" w/ them while the others cheer us on. They all "head bang" to the chant of "go birdie, go birdie". WE have a blast (though the neighbors think I'm a crazy lady, LOL). A new neighbor that was not aware of the crazy bird lady even called the cops because they thought abuse was going on, ROTFL. I had my birds all playing w/ all the lights on and from the screaming within the house and the "violent shadows" they saw thru the blinds (me and birds flapping our wings) they thought someone was being severely beaten!!

A person of course MUST realize their limits (financially, emotionally, etc.)and for some it may be 1 bird and to them I say kudos for seeing their limits. If you haven't any rescues near by look in your local paper for an unwanted bird. A bird that is no longer wanted because people did not know what they were getting into. Acquiring a bird from a private person helps in 2 ways ... you are not supporting the breeding of another baby and you are preventing THAT bird from ever going to a rescue. You may want to contact Eva she is from Oz also(not sure what part though) and she may be able to help you locate a bird in need.

As for Sally Blanchard (or Chris).... while much of her advice is good I find that her statement is rather two-faced. SHE is part of the problem because her magazine is full of breeders. She is helping them advertise. I don't care if they are only "good breeders" because even the "good breeders" are adding to the population of unwanted birds. (Okay all you Sally fans let the arrows fly, wink .)

#126407 - 01/17/04 03:51 PM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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littlecharlietoo Offline
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Sadsack,
Perhaps you misunderstood what I meant. By stating that it's everyone's problem I feel that we all need to do what we can to help them. That is not to say that YOU or anyone else should PERSONALLY adopt or re-home a bird. It is saying that you should EDUCATE people that you run into contact with and try to BETTER things when you see suffering especially if the sufferer is helpless and hurting through no fault of their own. Whether that be through a kind word, a donation to a charity or buying a toy and giving it to a bird in a store... whatever you do. (I feel it's more like saying EVERYONE in the world should hurt when they see pictures of the HOLLOCAUST and people STARVING because their government isn't or can't feed them and if they have the resources stretch out to help others... if no resources then ensure that YOU don't cause that to happen to others.) I don't find this to require pain above and beyond what we normally feel day to day and I don't find it martyrdom. I simply say that people should educate... as far as the *8-year old" her guardians (the ones who should actually OWN the bird) should also be grieved when they see a plucked, phobic homeless bird and if nothing else promise themselves that won't happen to their budgie. M2Mom, I'm not really a fan of theirs. I just found their STATEMENT moving... wink
Please notice that I said "This really resonated within me when I read it. This is why WE took in a neglect/abuse case and that's why we will do it again." I never said that it is or should be everyone's Philosophy... in fact I said repeatedly "some can, some can't"
And I can say that in retrospect I WASN'T (when we took her in) strong enough - she revealed the deepness of her phobia as time went on after I had already made my commitment to her. If I was then I wouldn't have had to GROW. The person I was a couple of years ago would be laughing at me right now... I'm glad I grew and changed. Now, lest you feel that I'm firing more arrows... I consider this forum (and this whole board) to be full of polite discussions. Normally if I'm not being polite the things that come out are pointedly rude. I'm not gifted with tact. smile You began by asking how "we" (people with atleast one rescue I'm assuming as the topic you referred to was about BOTH professional rescues and personal ones) could do it... I answered for myself and my opinion in a nutshell is still "...re-homing a bird is SERIOUS and I'm glad that people look deep within themselves before doing it. There's no reason to feel guilty for being honest with yourself." In otherwords... there's no reason to feel that you're a "child-molester" and I'm sure very few of us qualify as saints (I surely don't) you said that you've "I have salved my conscience by making donations to animal welfare organisations" you feel it is a salve but for the organizations you're donating to it is life's blood. My opinion again... you're underestimating yourself and what you're doing. IF there are no rescues around and there is no way to re-home a bird and you truly want to share your life with a bird the best you can do is provide a caring home for a lifetime and realize that you alone are responsible for that tiny life. Everyone here has on on-line personality and often I feel hampered by my inability to communicate properly... so I'll cross-post this... It's something that someone else posted that aslo resonated within me... It summarizes exactly the way I feel in words that I could never put together.
"In closing I'd like to share one of my favorite passages with you from a book entitled "Ethics on the Ark"

"One hope I have for the future is that we will recognize that if we keep animals in captivity, then what we owe them is everything. I hope we can come to a consensus that these animals are in our custody through no wish or fault of their own. They are refugees from a holocaust that humans have unleashed against nature. If we are to keep animals in captivity, then we must conform to the highest standards of treatment and
respect...for the animals themselves have no voice in human affairs, and as nature recedes their voices are ever more silent." --Dale Jamieson
p.s. yes, my posts are normally this long I have diahrea of the word processor smile

#126408 - 01/17/04 05:05 PM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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Sadsack,

You are right to question if you want a rescue bird or not. It is not something that you should go into lightly and I commend your researching and self examination.

If you're wanting a bird is to have a "God-like status" with them, then a rescue bird is not what you want, nor is it the attitude that anyone with a bird should have. These are wild animals and are not domesticated. After getting to know many people on this board, I believe that none of us want to be our bird's God, we want to be their companion and friend. With a rescue bird, we are their jailer and the recepient of their fear and aggression. We take in these birds to make them a member of our families and to be their "mom", not their God. We are their servants and slaves.

Many of us spend a lot of time in prayer for our birds and I believe in divine intervention. When a rescue bird makes progress, a lot of times it's only because of prayer. This is my belief and that is a matter of personal faith.

I am so sorry for your loss Sadsack. I respect you for your ability to look within yourself to see if you feel a rescue bird is something you can handle. The fact that you give donations and are in touch with your conscience shows that you are emotionally caring. Only you can determine if your are emotionally ready to take on a rescue bird?

Like previously posted, you don't have to get one that is damaged emotionally. There are some very loving, wonderful birds in rescues because they have lost their homes. You could provide them a wonderful home and not have to deal with some of the problems that an abused bird has.

I too am so impressed with some of the member's ability to own several birds. Like you, I don't feel capable of doing it and only have the one.

I am so glad that you are here and I look forward to reading your posts. Are you sure you're not Dennis Miller??? I hope your Rosetta Stone Internet holds out!!! HA! HA! You make me laugh!

Best Wishes to you Sadsack!!!

#126409 - 01/17/04 07:15 PM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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Sadsack~ Kindly do not try reading between lines...the words are there to be read. And totally for sake of ANY misunderstandings...NOPE smurfy is very thrilled to be part of this terrific site filled with awesome people & critters! I have had nothing but kind & compassionate & friendly interaction here since I first was welcomed ...I WOULD LIKE THAT on the record! Good Luck to you & your future choices!

#126410 - 01/18/04 01:28 AM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
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I adopted two birds through MyToos. Both had been rescued from an abused situation. One or both of them may have a long term (or short term, depends on the diagnosis) illness -- PDD.

It's true you don't know what you'll get with a rehomed bird. But on the other hand, you may not know the blessings you could receive because you were able to provide for these magnificent creatures.

Faith, our M2, was the one diagnosed with PDD and on med's. Echo, our wild caught ekkie (and so wild you couldn't touch her without losing a body part), was thought to have been exposed to PDD (Faith). I drove from central Florida, not once, but twice to South Carolina to meet with their rescuer, meet the birds, and decide if we'd be a good match.

Surprise, surprise. My vet here thinks my birds were mis-diagnosed. Faith was taken off of med's and is doing beautifully. Echo has tamed down to the point where she's calling us to come to her. And Faith, was the biggest surprise. I'm sure she was someone's loving pet at one time because as we learned to trust each other, she's turned out to be such treasure. She's sweet-natured, loud, clever, and blossoming in a hundred different ways.

There's a reason the people here at MyToos feels so strongly about adopting, rather than buying from a breeder.

I go home and cry when I hear stories about people impulse buying and then giving up their birds. I popped into our optometrist shop yesterday with Faith and I met a lady who asked me if I wanted to buy her CAG. I asked why she was getting rid of her bird. She said she'd had the bird two years and the family was going on vacation in March, didn't have anybody to watch it, and figured now was a good time to get rid of it. Or the lady in our grocery store who was so excited. She bought a baby U2 (not weaned) for her kids for Christmas. The kids are 8 & 10 and they're the one's responsible for feeding it. She wonders why the baby cries so much. Another horror story... A friend of a friend, just got a U2. I asked her if she'd seen the MyToos site. She said she looked at it once and never came back to it because she's sure her 8 month old U2 would never hurt her or her children. Apparently the baby's pretty finicky about what it wants to eat, so they're feeding it french fries and chicken legs because that's what it likes. No fruits, no veggies, and no pellets -- because it throws the fresh food and pellets out of its cage. Grrr......... I'll be willing to bet these birds will be sold and re-sold within two years.

We've all lost pets that have truly broken our hearts. We've all wondered (or know) if we were a little more attentive, if they might still be here with us today. That's life. Many of us on the MyToos board want to take up the gauntlet and provide a better home for all birds, not just our own. That's not to say it's your answer.

The birds that need to be re-homed, need love too. In fact, they need it more than one fresh out of the nest. They've lost faith in the human race. Some would rather commit suicide rather than be moved around like a chess piece in a game.

I believe in listening to my heart.... it leaves me open for life's little heartaches, but it also shares with me the joy and happiness of caring for others... be they feathered, furred, or soft-skinned.

Baggage? Yes. Would I do it all over again? Yes, in a heartbeat. Are they perfect? Yes, in my eyes and all who have come to know and love them. To see how far they've come, how much happier or healthier than are than when they arrived, to hear them scream at the top of their lungs, or watch them enjoying themselves with our remote controls, or dining room chairs... fills my heart to overflowing.

Only you can do what is right for you. We wish you the best with your decision.

Maria, Faith and Echo

#126411 - 01/24/04 04:53 PM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 633
Lei Offline
Lives Here
Lei  Offline
Lives Here

Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 633
Oklahoma City
I currently have 11 birds, 5 of which are TOOs. I am able to take care of all of them and give them the individual time that each of them requires. HOW you may ask...Simple. Each bird has different requirements. The budgies are good for about 5-15 mins at a time. The tiels are good for 15-30 mins at a time. The conures are good for 30-60 mins at a time. Jasper isn't hand tame and contently sits on his play top and interacts with us while we spend time with the other birds. The female TOOs all come and play on the bed with us for several hours at a time. Then Angel and Daisy spend time with us.

The one thing I have found true is that they do "flock" together and have have fun as a group. They dance to the music, play their own form of chase, and take great pleasure in sounding off at the kids that are walking to school. Our birds are grouped together according to species and spend time preening each other.

Currently there are 3 adults in our home and we have a flexible schedule and rotate time with each bird. Would I take another resuce? Depends on if I believed the rescue would fit in with my current flock and I could take PROPER care of the bird in need. If I felt the bird would be better someplace else, I would do everything in my power to help place the bird somewhere else. However, I firmly believe that when approached with a resuce/adoption, it is my responsibility to try and see if there is any way to help the human and bird work through their problems so the bird can stay in the home. Realistically this seldom happens, but when it does, it is the most rewarding experience.

The key is to establish a flexible routine and excerise disclipine in yourself and your birds. It is imperative that you realize your limits when it comes to patience, time, and money. I don't feel as though this board or its members expect any one person to do more than that which is within his/her own ability. I agree with the board in not purchasing babies from breeders or brokers and have a personal reason why I am so much against it. But this is a decision that each individual must make. I have never had a baby TOO and can only imagine how it would be... So this board has made you think and you are a little uncomfortable - GREAT! Maybe you will buy that baby TOO and give it a wonderful forever home or maybe your life will change along the way and that baby TOO will end up in a life of abuse and neglect along with many of the other TOOs that came from the breeders and brokers of the world. I am certain that every single TOO I have in my care (ALL 5) began in a home that was suppose to be a loving, forever home, but somehow life occured and things changed. This is why we are so passionate about our point of view!

Lei

#126412 - 01/25/04 08:21 PM Re: What is a rescue - reprise  
Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 74
Talula Offline
Member
Talula  Offline
Member

Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 74
San Diego
Hi Sadsack,

I have 3 birds. Well I don't have them, they have me and my mom.

Morocco (formally Maluka) is not a rescue, he was just moved into a new home. Wendy who Morocco owned previously needed someone who could take care of him. Fortunately she doesn't live too far away and she knows anytime she wants to see 'Rocco she can! smile In fact when we went on vacation for a week, we gave her his old cage, and he went to her house. Sure he screams, destroys, throws out all his food and bites, but after we are driven nuts he is sweet as pie.

Little Kermit the Senegal came to be from the bird store my friend is the former manager of. Kermit was dropped of with a note saying the owner couldn't take care of him. I got the call to come get him. He was a frightened little guy who had a little cage and no hand-holding affection. I have since become his favorite and he can't get enough of being near me.

Talula (Ms. Piggy hence the naming of Kermit) Was not given to me, but she is my pride and joy. She is in love with kermit who won't have anything to do with her.

So as far as getting a loony bird, they are all loony! They all have quirks. Talula in the meanest of all the birds and I had her since she was a little fluff ball. Morocco seems to adjust to anything, and Kermit has come around a great deal after love and affection. Maybe someone you know has a bird they cannot take care of. Birds seem to be pretty resiliant. I hope there is something out there for you. I am sure there is, and it will come knocking on your door when you don't expect it.

Our hearts heal over time when we lose a pet, sometimes it takes a year or two before our hearts are ready for a new one. So keep your eyes open.

Also you should not allow yourself to feel guilty for your choices as far as what others will think. People like to condemn others for not following their own convictions.

Good Luck!


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