Who's Online Now
0 registered members (), 70 guests, and 5 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Search

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#126294 - 12/20/03 10:44 PM one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 382
blson Offline
Member
blson  Offline
Member

Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 382
USA
I am leery of some rescues. I am very leery of dog-cat places when they have a bird drop off. There is a rural dog-cat SPCA in New York State that had two birds, an umbrella cockatoo and a blue and gold macaw, dropped off by the adult children of the owner a few days after the owner died. The man who runs the place put an adoption fee of $1,000.00 on each bird. His logic as he told me was to make sure that each bird had a good home. The cockatoo was adopted Thanksgiving weekend. The macaw is still waiting. The SPCA did absolutely no medical exam by any vet. They did not have a special bird screening-they used the dog-cat form. They adopted out the birds without cages-the cages they were living in and used to. They are keeping the two large wrought iron cages for future birds that may be dropped off without cages. My point is that a $1,000.00 adoption fee to the first person with the money to me is selling not adopting out. I have sent a few checks to a few legitimate parrot rescues but why don't they adopt out more of the physically and mentally healthy birds? I know that the birds with health issues-both physical and mental, birds that will always require very special care are best cared for at the rescue and not adopted out. The 50 mile radius living is not always the best rule. The 6 months to one year of intensive volunteer work is not always the best rule. If these rescues want more checks from me they are going to have to be a little more realistic. They can't keep every single bird forever. I understand the reason for their rules. But there are people that can prove that they can adopt a bird and provide an excellent home without doing all the requirements. The motto Don't buy Don't breed ADOPT ! is excellent but some of the rescues need to also share this motto by actually adopting out more birds to great homes that may not be within so many miles and without the person volunteering so many months. I have changed my philosophy and am giving to individuals that are doing rescue in their own home footing the bills with their own money and adopting out with very little or no money exchanged. When you get real real big, a few hundred big parrots you get disease, you sometimes can get a grandiose attitude that nobody could possibly care for these birds other than me or us. And what is the difference as far as the number of large parrots rescued or just being kept between the average rescue and the average hoarder? Just as not all parrot rescues are great not all hoarders are bad. I know a hoarder, takes in anything, takes finch through macaw to avian vet., spends tons of money on the birds, rehabs them, gets them on a good diet, and then adopts them out for only what she has in them and I support this woman. Some people call her a hoarder but then again anyone with many birds no matter how clean and well cared for the place and birds are is labeled a hoarder. I used to be really stuck on the 501 C thing. I no longer am. I am stuck on people doing the right thing, taking in unwanted birds, taking care of any and all medical issues, rehabing, improving diet, and then either giving or only collecting the money that they put into the bird. I know there are many 100% legitimate rescues.But I do think most have way too high standards for adopting out. It is either one extreme or the other. SPCA adopts out to the first person with the buck and provides no education or the bird rescue makes it near impossible for some people who can provide an excellent educated home. Just me rambling again. Sorry.

#126295 - 12/21/03 06:57 AM Re: one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,069
littlecharlietoo Offline
Lives Here
littlecharlietoo  Offline
Lives Here

Joined: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,069
Huntsville, Alabama
Blson,
let me first say that I agree with you about the rural ASPCA... our local doesn't give out info, cages or interview thoroughly for birds. I'm not sure if it's ignorance on their part or intentional profit seeking. I've spoken with a few people involved and from their responses lean more towards ignorance. (They simply work with so many dogs and cats that they don't see how different birds really are.)
Next let me say that I disagree with you about the adoption rules you sited as being unreasonable. Normally I stay out of this sort of thing... but I've seen this kind of comment often lately and it's really been bugging me. Many (if not most) of these birds have been passed around like hot potatoes. They have been betrayed over and over again. People see them, and "fall in love" or worse yet just see a "cheap bird" and want to take them home. If someone can't commit 6 months of volunteering (BTW that normally means 3 days a week for a couple of hours each time) what makes anyone think they'll commit a lifetime to the same bird? Can't spare a couple of hours three times a week? How can they provide the DAILY attention that ANY parrot needs?
The 50 mile radius is VERY reasonable if the rescue does in home checks (which I believe EVERY resopnsible rescue should do!) Taking care of birds is expensive and time consuming enough without the rescue having to spend gas/maintenance money and hours of time driving to check a home or the status of a placed parrot.

Sure, there are homes out there that can't meet requirements that are GREAT! (We're one of them, BTW... we're not even 250 miles from a good rescue!) BUT there are many more homes that AREN'T GOOD that aren't considered because of these blanket rules. How in the world are the people who run rescues (many of whom are overworked to the point of exhausion already) supposed to find time to look at everyone who wants a parrot? The lines have to be drawn somewhere! We live outside those lines... but we send food, cages and money anyways. These birds deserve a home to live out the rest of their lives in even if it is a sanctuary and not a home... not to be betrayed again. Unless they have the ability to check on adoptors (thru home visits and watching adoptors interact with the bird over several months) rescues can't ensure that they won't see that same bird again.
Now that I've had my little rant... let me say that none of this is aimed at you, personally. No doubt, your home is a good one. Sometimes life isn't fair and good people are thrown out with the bad... but that's life.

#126296 - 12/21/03 03:30 PM Re: one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 359
Valex Offline
Member
Valex  Offline
Member

Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 359
Massachusetts
i think that adoption policies and fees are a good thing, these people have the birds best interests in mind and don't want to see them be passed on from home to home like they already have....don't believe me? go see them at a rescue with the hope in their eyes, most people don't have the commitment to stay in a marriage, let alone taking care of a noisy sometimes aggressive, long lived, messy animal that costs you a fortune. I think that rescues SHOULD keep ALL their strict rules for adoptions, and charge a hefty adoption fee as well. If you can't afford to adopt a bird, how are you going to pay for the vet bills, the toys, the cage. I would love to save them all, i can't so i volunteer, and i am not adopting any more, i have a full house already....just helping the ones waiting.
there i said my peace

#126297 - 12/21/03 05:47 PM Re: one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 324
Alleaa Offline
Member
Alleaa  Offline
Member

Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 324
Space Coast, Florida
I have a small home rescue, I've been called a hoarder and a collector, yes everyone I collect plucked & sometimes even sick birds just cause I can LOL.

Yesterday I went to pick up 2 birds a B&G and a caique. The owners whom wanted them gone quickly as they were going on a vacation, couldn't meet me 1/2 way or do anything in the way of transportation. So I had to rent a truck which cost me $250.00 including gas and took the 10 hour drive. (by the way I pulled up and their sitting in the driveway was a huge SUV. Next I will take them to the vet. another $100.00. And I am not even going to mention the cost of food, toys, and whatever else they need (and will get)

I do this on my own, I don't ask for nor do I receive any donations and I am not complaining, this is what I want to do. I am telling you this to make a point. Larger rescues do way more than this and have many many more birds to take care of. In order to run these rescues they have to have some sort of funds coming in. And I have to say there are good & bad rescues just like everything in life.

As for spending time with the birds, I wouldn't hand one of these birds off to just anyone, I don't care if the president of the US gave a reference. I want to see how you and the bird get along together. The majority of the birds I have here now will stay here, one I picked up yesterday will go to a new home, and I will have the person come here, more than once, and I will also go to their home. I don't think this is too much to ask.

#126298 - 12/22/03 05:21 AM Re: one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Apr 2003
Posts: 389
Maria Offline
Member
Maria  Offline
Member

Joined: Apr 2003
Posts: 389
Cocoa, FL
I agree with you, blson, that it should not always be necessary to volunteer many hours before adopting. However, I say this with the clarifier that each situation is unique. And I also think that to put an adoption fee on the bird, outside of expenses occurred (vet, special needs, etc.) is selling, not adopting.

I'm not sure that
Quote:
birds with health issues-both physical and mental, birds that will always require very special care are best cared for at the rescue and not adopted out.
though.

I adopted an M2 and an ekkie from a member of the MyToos board. The latest vet check after both birds were rescued (and three months before I adopted them) thought that the M2 had PDD and the ekkie had been exposed to PDD in addition to their being abused (locked in a closet for three years amongst other abuses).

Now that being said, after much research and soul searching and communicating almost daily with the wonderful lady that had these birds, after a couple of months, I made the 600 mile drive up to visit and to see how the birds responded to me. This was also to allow us both to meet, give us a chance to chat and then to decide if my family and I might be suitable adopters, and if we'd be interested in working towards the next step in adopting these two birds.

A month later, after many more hours on the phone and writing e-mails back and forth, and sending pictures of their new cages (we've nicknamed them the Taj Mahal I and Taj Mahal II), ordering new toys, and allowing their special order food to arrive via FedEx, my husband and I made the trip again and spent a three day weekend visiting before picking up Faith and Echo.

We weren't asked to pay a fee, we didn't volunteer 6 months at a rescue, and we'd never owned a 'too before. We have been owned by amazons and lovebirds several years previously though so we weren't completely unprepared.

This was not an easy adoption. We were adopting at least one high-risk, high maintenance bird with the possibility of the second one coming down with that dreaded disease as well. We were prepared for large medical bills, special food bills and all that comes with adopting these "special birds" though.

Fortunately for us, the story has a very happy ending -- our avian vet here, after many tests, did not think Faith had PDD, so we discontinued her medicine 6 months ago and she's doing wonderfully. She's a very sweet bird and has adapted quite easily into our family. The ekkie was a wild caught and had to be toweled in order to be touched or examined. She connected with our 19 year old son and can be held and petted and fed by hand now.

I think whether or not to volunteer, or pay a fee or be younger than a certain age (or older) depends very much on the situation. Speaking for myself, I have my hands full with our two darlings now, but that's not to say we wouldn't adopt again sometime down the road. But having "proven myself" with one adoption, I would hope I wouldn't have to volunteer "x" amount of hours for "x" amount of time in order to show I had the basics down for caring for another bird. I also do not feel that paying a fee somehow qualifies you as a good home. If I were adopting a bird out, I'd be much more interested in references from (and for) an avian vet (if possible) in the area. Pictures and receipts of the bird's cage ensuring adequate size and assorted toys and food as well. Interview the family. How much time will the bird spend with each person? Do they have a bird-sitter already lined up? I'd also encourage pictures of the family once the bird has gone to their new home. Keep the lines of communication open. I think being pro-active in adopting is more effective than sitting and requiring certain standards be met.

But that's just my opinion.

Maria

#126299 - 12/22/03 05:36 PM Re: one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 155
Alison Offline
Member
Alison  Offline
Member

Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 155
Massachusetts
Every rescue has their own way of doing things, Some are good, some are bad. If a rescue you are interested in dealing with is doing something that you disagree with, or that you don't understand you should ask them why they do it. If they cannot give you a reasonable explanation, move on to another rescue. There are alot good rescues around, but there are many bad ones too. Each rescue should be judged on their own practices and should not be lumped together because of what another one has done. A legitimate rescue will have no problem explaining certain aspects to you. You may not agree with everything a particular rescue does, but they may have a very legitimate reason for doing it. But, if you don't ask, you will never know why. The best way to find out if a rescue is doing a good job or not is to schedule a visit and see for yourself. It is very easy for someone to 'trash' a rescues reputation without having the slightest idea, or concern if what they are trashing them about is true. People make up stories about others all the time just to start trouble, or get attention and too many people are willing to take everything said as the truth without bothering to find out for themselves. Rumors are like a hobby for some people, but often times innocent people are hurt because of malicious untrue rumors, or generalized statements which seem to include everyone of a specific idea or type of organization. Keep in mind that legitimate rescues are in it to help the birds. That is a huge finacial and emotional responsibility that is time consuming as well frustrating and heartbreaking at times. Most rescues are independent and should be judged individually.

#126300 - 12/22/03 06:14 PM Re: one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Mar 2003
Posts: 178
sterdon Offline
Member
sterdon  Offline
Member

Joined: Mar 2003
Posts: 178
cape cod ma
Well I run A rescue and have thought about the adoption policy alot. what I believe is that if you live to far from a rescue to do the volunteering then I ask the person to do volunteer work at a animal rescue near them for at least 30 to 60 hours depending on there bird exerience. Also I do require that the people come here to get the bird they are asking to adopt and spend some time that day to make sure they fit together. I do charge a small adoption fee to help the birds here. I have placed birds with people out of state and country do I like to, not really but there are cases that it works I do expect pictures and letters often on the bird and if I know some one I can trust close I ask them to do a home check for me. If people are willing to do this then i will adopt birds farther away. The main reason I don't like to do this is I like people to support there local rescue but if there is none then I will do what I can to help.

Sterdon

#126301 - 12/28/03 06:11 AM Re: one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 11
Bobbie Offline
New Member
Bobbie  Offline
New Member

Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 11
Virginia
First I have to say that I am a volunteer for several animals rescues in my area so I am NOT downplaying the need for volunteers doing rescue. I mostly foster animals, pull them out of shelters right before they are put down, vet visits, transports, get on my soap box and educate people, etc. But if someone were to say to me that I had to dedicate so many hours per week at a shelter, there is no way I could do that. That doesn't mean that I don't have time for my own pets, 2 dogs and 2 birds. It's because I have 2 young children and my time is spent at home with them and the animals. It is very difficult for me to get out much and having to commit to volunteering at a shelter should not determine whether I would have adequate time to take care of a new pet. When I do any volunteer work, I drag my 4 and 7 year old with me. It would be difficult working at a shelter with them there. I truly realize the need to screen people carefully for any animal they want to add to their house because I have seen many animals tossed to the curb because the owners just couldn't be bothered anymore and it is hard making that determination on who would be a good adopter and who wouldn't but I just wanted to put in my two cents to maybe help someone realize that just because someone cannot dedicate time every week outside of their home at an animal shelter does not mean that can't dedicate hours of their time to the new pet they will be bringing home.

Bobbie

#126302 - 02/20/04 08:32 PM Re: one extreme or the other (too long)  
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 20
Karen & Tigger Offline
New Member
Karen & Tigger  Offline
New Member

Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 20
Reading PA
I have read through all of these messages on this subject, and I agree and disagree on a lot of them. But as far as sterdon, yours sounds the best. I live in Pennsylvania and wanted another bird. I checked around and not being an experienced hand feeder decided I didnt want to do the baby so I looked for a rescue. Everyone around here has the mileage restriction. Not as much volunteer times as stated in these posts but you had to take classes which cost money then pay their fee. Which mind you I had no problem with but I am no where near pittsburgh and I forget where the other one was. I ended up feeling sorry for a gw i found on one of the classified sites paid too much but she deserved it. The only rescue areas I have around me take them in and keep them there is no chance of adoption and I think there is only one of those left. Every week there is another bird in the paper, advertisement in the grocery store, I have even seen an ad that someone wanted to trade a fish tank and a dog for a m2!
If anyone knows of a private rescue in the southeastern pa area kindly let me know!


Moderated by  BE2Cassie, Beeps, EchosMom, Janny 

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0
Page Time: 0.032s Queries: 13 (0.009s) Memory: 5.0458 MB (Peak: 5.3724 MB) Zlib enabled. Server Time: 2018-02-21 17:21:39 UTC