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#213359 - 12/10/09 02:58 PM This is a typical cockatoo story in the news  
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Jerry Offline
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Here is ANOTHER typical abused cockatoo story in the paper. In this case, they are in denial as to the cause of course. It's HUMAN ABUSE as usual.

Pitiful Moluccan

The really sad thing is that these "news stories" always make fun of these pitiful birds instead of trying to help them.

#213361 - 12/10/09 03:36 PM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: Jerry]  
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JBryan Offline
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She has plucked out her plumage due to a disease?

Yeah, I guess you could describe a lot of humans that way.


Whoever coined the term "bird brain" was probably projecting.
#213363 - 12/10/09 06:01 PM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: JBryan]  
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Chewy Offline
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poor thing frown


look to your birds for love
Chewy RB2
Lightning-parakeet
Zeus-zebra finch
RIP
Eli
little foot Cockatiels
#213364 - 12/10/09 06:02 PM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: JBryan]  
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She has Beak and Feather Disease. She lives at the Broward County Shelter in Florida or she did. She should have died a long time ago because of the disease. Definitely a fighter.

Bev


Owner: DebRan Bird Toys
#213365 - 12/10/09 06:11 PM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: ZazuSally]  
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JBryan Offline
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I'll say.


Whoever coined the term "bird brain" was probably projecting.
#213366 - 12/10/09 06:27 PM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: JBryan]  
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Chewy Offline
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how do birds get that? And how do you prevent that?


look to your birds for love
Chewy RB2
Lightning-parakeet
Zeus-zebra finch
RIP
Eli
little foot Cockatiels
#213369 - 12/10/09 07:29 PM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: Chewy]  
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Chewy, they get it from other birds. It is extremely contagious. Can even be carried on clothes.

Bev


Owner: DebRan Bird Toys
#213495 - 12/13/09 04:52 AM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: Jerry]  
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ParrotPerson Offline
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OSCAR! I know Oscar, or at least, know of her very well. One of our annual volunteers works with her on a regular basis. And yes, she's aware of the dangers of PBFD and takes measures to not spread it when she's in this part of the country.

Actually, she has more feathers than I remember...


"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated"
#213577 - 12/14/09 08:27 PM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: Chewy]  
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GregM Offline
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Originally Posted By: Chewy
poor thing frown


+1...makes me violent...

#213852 - 12/19/09 08:54 AM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: GregM]  
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ThorsMom Offline
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Will her feathers NEVER grow back? And she's 35 years old? Although so very, very sad....I am just simply amazed at the will she has to survive. And so many people sell these birds short. Amazing. And you're right Jerry, the media should do more than just be ignorant, laugh, and not DO anything....but then again, that seems to have become the way of "most" of the world anymore.


Cockatoos Leave Feather Dust On Your Soul.......
#213863 - 12/19/09 05:20 PM Re: This is a typical cockatoo story in the news [Re: ThorsMom]  
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Liisa B Offline
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Quote:
Psittacine Beak and Feather
Disease (PBFD)

Description: Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease - The virus causing this disease is a member of the Circoviridae. The molecular structure of the genome of the virus is roughly a 2,000 base, circular, single stranded DNA. PBFD virus has a strong resemblance to Porcine Circovirus as well as to a number of plant viruses such as the Banana Bungy virus.

The disease is thought to be specific for psittacines and all psittacine species should be considered susceptible. Parrots known to be particularly affected by PBFD include, but are not limited to, Cockatoos, Macaws African Grey Parrots, Ringneck parakeets, Eclectus Parrots, Lovebirds.

Causes fatal infections, primarily in young birds. Older birds may overcome the disease with few lasting affects. Some believe that these surviving birds become carriers able to shed the disease at a later date. Others believe that a percentage of birds are able to eradicate the disease from their system leaving them with a natural immunity that can be passed on to their offspring.


The virus that causes PBFD can also affect the liver, brain, and immune system causing diminished resistance to infections. Consequently premature death usually occurs from these secondary bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral infections.




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Transmission: Transmission of the virus from one individual to another is primarily through direct contact, inhalation or ingestion of aerosols, crop-feeding, infected fecal material, and feather dust. The virus can also be transmitted via contaminated surfaces such as bird carriers, feeding formula, utensils, food dishes, clothing, and nesting materials. The viral particles, if not destroyed can remain viable in the environment for months, long after the infected bird is gone.

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Symptoms: Symptoms include irreversible loss of feathers, shedding of developing feathers, development of abnormal feathers, new pinched feathers, and loss of powder down. Other possible symptoms include overgrown or abnormal beak, symmetrical lesions on the beak and occasionally nails.
Immunosuppression, rapid weight loss, and depression are also possible in later stages of the disease.

Secondary viral, fungal, bacterial or parasitic infections often occurs as a result of diminished immunity caused by a PBFD viral infection. Additional symptoms not mentioned above including elevated white cell counts are generally due to secondary infections and may not be directly related to PBFD virus infections.


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Prevention: Strict isolation of all diseased birds to halt the the spread of the disease. DNA testing of all birds of susceptible species to rule out latent infection. DNA testing of aviary equipment and environment to test for possible contamination.

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Treatment: No known treatment. Experimental vaccines are being developed.

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Diagnosis: Skin biopsy, surgical biopsy of feather and shaft, or PCR testing of blood, swab, and feather samples.

PBFD should be considered in any bird suffering from abnormal feather loss or development. A biopsy of the abnormal feathers including the calimus (shaft) of the feather can be examined for signs of virus. However, since the PBFD virus does not affect all feathers simultaneously this method of evaluating a sample may have a high degree of error. Additionally, birds with PBFD can have normal feathers and the PCR test is the most effective method available for detecting the virus in birds before feather lesions develop.

Some birds infected with the virus, test positive, but never show clinical signs. Other birds which test positive may develop an immune response sufficient enough to fight off the infection and test negative after 30-90 days. Therefore, it is recommended to re-test all PBFD positive birds 60-90 days after the initial testing was completed. If the second sample remains positive, the bird should be considered permanently infected and can be expected to show clinical symptoms of the disease.


Excerpt from Avian Biotech.


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