Who's Online Now
0 registered members (), 69 guests, and 0 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Search

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#189424 - 01/06/09 03:31 AM This Bears Repeating  
Joined: May 2003
Posts: 2,005
hellobaby Offline
Lives Here
hellobaby  Offline
Lives Here
*****

Joined: May 2003
Posts: 2,005
USA
I've posted about this before, but I believe it's a good thing to repost. As many of you know, I've suffered from wicked migraines due to scents for a long time now. There is more and more evidence to show that the petrochemicals used in fragrances in every day products are very toxic. Not only to the respiratory system, but also to the neurological system and digestive system. If you're (or anyone you know) experience migraines, respiratory issues (ranging from a stuffy nose to severe asthma), unexplained dizzy spells, feeling sick to your stomach, these types of things could be caused by long-term usage of products containing these harmful chemicals. Now, think about how these types of things may effect our bird's systems.


Exerpts from the article "Stop Making Scents"



Quote:
What's that smell?

You can't watch TV today without catching commercials peddling fragranced products. In theory that's not such a bad thing. After all, cultures throughout history perfumed their homes and persons, if only out of necessity given the state of their hygiene and sanitation systems. Think of the potpourris, sachets, and nosegays so much in favor not all that long ago. Perhaps we all have an innate desire to smell like a breath of spring, and what harm could there be in that?

Well, none until you industrialize the process. Before the early 20th century, the fragrances in high demand were derived directly from plants or animals, but after World War II, companies turned to petrochemicals as the source of manufactured scents and expanded the uses of fragrances exponentially. Natural fragrance preparations still exist, of course, but synthetic scents have taken over the marketplace, with sales topping $18 billion annually.

With our spritzed, sprayed, and slathered-on 21st century barely underway, virtually every conventional cleaning and body care product on the market contains chemically manufactured fragrances.

Obvious products include perfumes, deodorants, soaps, shampoos, laundry detergents, candles, and cleaning products. The not-so-obvious range from shirts to sports drinks. And new products keep coming. Japanese filmgoers get a nose full of fragrance while watching movies, as special machines pump out scents synchronized to certain scenes. And several companies recently announced plans to chemically scent the packaging for products: Cookie boxes, fruit containers, and drink caps will soon emit synthetic scents. And last year, more than one thousand new air fresheners appeared on US stores shelves. This phenomenon means more exposure for everyone. Unfortunately, most of the companies behind these marketing schemes never consider the dangers lurking in their fragranced products, and we consumers have little choice about whether or not we'll be exposed to them—short of never venturing into a supermarket or department store again.


Mystery ingredients

...products containing synthetic fragrances are not regulated by any government agency. Fragrance formulas are considered "trade secrets," a designation that gives companies the legal right not to disclose product ingredients, even to the FDA.

If a company provides an ingredient label, it only need list the catchall term fragrance, even though hundreds of chemicals may make up one formulation. The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) reports that "95 percent of the ingredients used to create fragrances today are synthetic compounds derived from petroleum, including benzene derivatives, aldehydes, and many other known toxins and sensitizers. Many of these substances have been linked to cancer, birth defects, central nervous system disorders, and allergic reactions." NAS targets fragrances as one of six categories of chemicals that should be tested for neurotoxicity. This puts synthetic fragrances in the company of insecticides, heavy metals, solvents, food additives, and air pollutants.


Is your body polluted?

According to the Environmental Health Coalition of Western Massachusetts, approximately 20 percent of the population reacts adversely to synthetic fragrance, with anywhere from 3.5 to 6 percent experiencing debilitating or even life-threatening reactions. Infants, children, the elderly, and people with compromised immune systems are particularly vulnerable.

"Even for people who have lost their sense of smell," Bridges points out, "symptoms still appear when they are around synthetic fragrances, since it's not the smell but the toxicants comprising the scent that are dangerous." She further explains that while an allergic reaction might cause congestion or sneezing, reactions to synthetic fragrances often consist of a poisoning response, which may include migraines, difficulty breathing, fatigue, hormonal imbalances, and digestive problems.

"But sensitive people," Bridges emphasizes, "aren't the only ones affected by synthetic scents." Fragrances pose a health issue for everyone. Although most people believe small amounts of chemicals are harmless, studies show that the adage "the dose makes the poison" no longer holds true. Researchers have shown that even low-level exposure causes serious health effects, as our bodies absorb and accumulate the chemicals we get exposed to daily. The Environmental Working Group also found troubling results after studying the impact of cumulative chemical exposures termed "the body burden" (http://www.ewg.org/bodyburden). And the Environmental Protection Agency discovered that indoor air contains two to five times more toxic chemicals than outdoor air, with fragrance chemicals contributing heavily.

You might be wondering, somewhat skeptically, "Why do I feel fine after years of applying lotions and perfumes?"

Most people who now feel sick around fragrance chemicals had many prior exposures and appeared immune to the dangers, until their bodies broke down. Fragrance toxins silently add stress to our natural detoxification systems, and the impact might take longer to show up in a healthy adult or may manifest in a seemingly unrelated condition like reproductive problems or cancer. Our bodily defenses didn't evolve to process and store petrochemicals, and wrestling with these toxins keeps our bodies from doing their real jobs. Furthermore, people may not even realize a product causes their symptoms. They may suffer chronic headaches or hives, completely unaware of the connection to their perfume or their favorite detergent's aroma.

Although most people associate fragrances with smell, the chemical components don't merely enter the body through the nose. Wearing scented products or even being near others who use them leads to the absorption of fragrance chemicals through the skin (a direct link to the bloodstream), the respiratory system, digestive system, and the eyes. Modern fragrances are also extremely persistent, designed to cling for a long time to fabric, hair, walls, whatever. Some fragrance constituents, like those in softener sheets, can never be fully removed from clothes. And like plug-ins and perfumes, dryer sheets contain nerve-deadening chemicals, narcotics, and known carcinogens.

If you'd like to find out whether or not synthetic scents affect you, consider conducting an experiment to see how you feel away from direct exposure. Write down all of your symptoms (headache, hoarse voice, rash, etc.), then switch entirely to fragrance-free products for at least one month (and put your old ones out of the house). Note if your symptoms have decreased or disappeared.

And before you spritz fragrance, consider that others are at the mercy of your product choices. The fragrance-intolerant often find it awkward to ask for consideration. But without our awareness and compassion, these people are prevented from going to work and school, socializing, or being active in their communities. With experts estimating that 60 percent of the population will suffer from sensitivities by 2020, isn't it about time we cleared the air?

Safe Alternatives to:

Dryer Sheets. Try Nellie's Dryer Balls or safe, reusable cloths by Static Eliminator. Or use an aluminum foil ball in the dryer, a 1/2 to 1 cup of vinegar in the rinse cycle, or separate your synthetics and cottons when drying.

Laundry Detergents. For safer detergents and softeners, use fragrance-free versions from Seventh Generation, Ecos, and Mountain Green. Or try the Oxy Ball or 1/2 cup of baking soda per load instead of detergent.

Air Fresheners. Instead of masking odors, identify and remove the source. Take shoes off at the door, empty the trash often. Try natural mineral zeolite, baking soda, or Borax. Use cedar blocks, or simmer cinnamon sticks, cloves, or allspice. If you need to spray, try Citra-Solv's AirScents, which uses real citrus scents—or make your own with distilled water and essential oils.

Filtration. Air filters can also help improve indoor air quality, but not all purifiers are the same. Get a filter that contains no plastics or other materials that off-gas. Reputable companies include Allerair, Aireox, IQ Air, and Austin Air.

Essential Oils, Candles, and Incense. A good alternative to synthetic scents, essential oils can be placed around the house, worn as perfume, or used in cleaning and body products. For candles, try soy or beeswax alternatives, unscented or with essential oils. Don't assume all incense is safe; it has combustible materials, may include contaminants, and may feature artificial fragrances.

Cleaning Products. The most inexpensive, safe cleansers are baking soda and water (for deodorizing), white vinegar (for cleaning when mixed with water and a little soap), Bon Ami (for scrubbing), and hydrogen peroxide (for disinfecting). Try Dr. Bronner's Sal Suds and Seventh Generation's cleansers.

Bodycare Products.

• Soap: Sappo Hill Unscented, Kiss My Face Olive Oil, Dr. Bronner's Baby Mild, Tom's of Maine Unscented Natural Glycerin Soap, Terressentials Unscented

• Deodorant: Kiss My Face Active Enzyme Unscented, Tom's of Maine Unscented, Jason Aloe Vera, Lafe's Natural Crystal Stick

• Shaving Lotion: Kiss My Face Unscented Shaving Gel

• Shampoo/Conditioner: Earth Science Pure Essentials Fragrance-Free, Dr. Bronner's Baby Mild, Magick Botanicals, Tijeras Unscented

• Hair Gel: Aubrey B5 Design Gel, Magick Botanicals, Kiss My Face

• Moisturizer: Organic oils (jojoba, sesame, apricot), Kiss My Face, Magick Botanicals, Jason, MyChelle Dermaceuticals

• Sunblock: Aubrey, Vanicream, Jason Chemical- and Fragrance-free


I urge everyone to pass this along.


If you must cripple a creature
to keep it, perhaps you should
reconsider its suitability as a pet.
#189453 - 01/06/09 06:09 AM Re: This Bears Repeating [Re: hellobaby]  
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,568
Ladyhutch Offline
Lives Here
Ladyhutch  Offline
Lives Here

Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,568
Oregon
Thank you for posting this HB. I also suffer severe migraines from chemicals. Fragrances send me into a tail spin. I sold Avon products several years ago and I do believe that is when I became sensitized. It is very hard to go out in public because of all of the offensive (to me) smells that assault me. We are completely fragrance free here. (too bad my daughter-in-law is just the opposite) sick
Sharon


You have two choices: accept things the way they are, or have courage to change them. J Kanani


#189503 - 01/06/09 11:23 PM Re: This Bears Repeating [Re: Ladyhutch]  
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 140
Elfhome Offline
Member
Elfhome  Offline
Member

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 140
Philadelphia, PA
I know what you mean, Ladyhutch. My sister has terrible allergies. My immediate family is very sensitive. Some people do not understand that asthma and migraines are not something to be joked about, or they don't even understand the harm they are doing. It is so hard to find a decent shampoo/detergent/soap. Should it be so hard to find a product that doesn't reek?

On the plus side, I must say that growing up in a nice scent-free household prepared me well for keeping Bella's little airways safe.


"A Robin Redbreast in a cage
Puts all Heaven in a Rage."
~William Blake
#189540 - 01/07/09 03:25 AM Re: This Bears Repeating [Re: Elfhome]  
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,209
Bird Mom Offline
Lives Here
Bird Mom  Offline
Lives Here
***

Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,209
Maryland, USA
We started using dryer balls about a year ago & I'm experimenting with the laundry mineral balls. My husband gets really dirty in his construction job so I usually wash his stuff twice. The oxy balls seem to be working...and the dryer balls are great.


Gail
#189577 - 01/07/09 05:17 AM Re: This Bears Repeating [Re: Bird Mom]  
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,721
spinnyspoo Offline
Lives Here
spinnyspoo  Offline
Lives Here

Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,721
Western Canada
Also, instead of using 'fabric softener' you can put 1/2 a cup of vinegar in the rinse water. Part of the reason why people's clothes are so scratchy, is that there is so much soap left over in the clothing. Vinegar helps get rid of it, leaving your clothes much softer and reducing the chances of becoming sensitized to the detergent.

Quote:
nerve-deadening chemicals, narcotics, and known carcinogens.


Narcotics? I actually find that hard to believe. A narcotic is an opium derivative like heroin, codiene, opium... and those are very controlled substances.

Last edited by spinnyspoo; 01/07/09 05:20 AM. Reason: err?

Wanna Bill? Wanna Bill?
-No Bill, I'm busy-
Dontcha wanna Bill? Dontcha wanna good boy?
#189892 - 01/11/09 11:03 PM Re: This Bears Repeating [Re: spinnyspoo]  
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 5,852
jm47 Offline
Chained to the Computer
jm47  Offline
Chained to the Computer
***

Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 5,852
central Iowa
I'm glad to know that the things I use are safe: we are sensitive enough to smelly chemicals that both hubby and I are pretty diligent about avoiding the "soap aisle" at the market, and of course, we don't subject the birds to it, either.
I buy baking soda several pounds at a time, and most of our personal cleaning things (soaps, deodorants, shampoos, lotions, and so on) are scented with plant substances, if at all.
A vanilla bean, a small bunch of lavender blossoms, cocoa butter, mint leaves, fennel, and the whole world of scented pelargonium plants: there are way more possibilities than come in spray cans!
Oh, and we recently discovered another source, with the assistance of Bill the cockatiel: citrus leaves! He chews the leaves of whatever houseplants are near him, and we keep only ones listed as "bird safe", and Matthew noticed the other day that Bill smelled really nice, so started checking on what the little guy had been chewing. TaDAAA! Once you get past the thorns, pick a citrus leaf, wipe it gently on your skin or clothing (no need to rub hard) and you are "pew-fumed" for the Big Occasion!

Last edited by jm47; 01/11/09 11:06 PM.

Jody
#189897 - 01/11/09 11:17 PM Re: This Bears Repeating [Re: jm47]  
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,591
FeatheredAngels Offline
Lives Here
FeatheredAngels  Offline
Lives Here

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,591
Ever since we had birds in our home, we went completely chemical and scent free here. However now my sense of smell has become very acute and anyone entering our home with perfumes or cologne, just about knocks me over and sometimes and I get a headache. Luckily we have a separate bird room, in case someone comes over with too much scent on sick. We don't have a great deal of company fortunately, our schedules are far too busy for much entertaining and honestly we prefer spending our time with the birds grin They smell lovely!!!!


Deborah
A Too is not a pet, it is a choice for life!


#189924 - 01/12/09 01:01 AM Re: This Bears Repeating [Re: FeatheredAngels]  
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,568
Ladyhutch Offline
Lives Here
Ladyhutch  Offline
Lives Here

Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,568
Oregon
Me too Deborah. And the biggest offender is my son. He does love his cologne. crazy
Sharon


You have two choices: accept things the way they are, or have courage to change them. J Kanani



Moderated by  BE2Cassie, Beeps, EchosMom, Janny 

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0
Page Time: 0.030s Queries: 14 (0.007s) Memory: 5.0292 MB (Peak: 5.3577 MB) Zlib enabled. Server Time: 2020-08-13 14:37:41 UTC