Real Cockatoo Facts!   
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Real Cockatoo Facts! » Cockatoo Forums » Behavior & Behavior Problems » why

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: why
lisa
unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post 
My bird keeps biting me ..no provocation or anything I dont know why.... can someone help I was petting her tonight and she just jumped in my face and bit my lip and chin I love her and I know that she is healthy but she keeps biting me.
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Michael
Admin


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Michael     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I was hoping someone would jump in with suggestions but that hasn't seemed to happen. I am by no means an authority on this subject but I will relate how I deal with the biting of our U2 (Chloe).

This is breeding season for Cockatoos during which time they will be more aggressive. You should try to not allow your bird to get too close to your face (breeding season or not).

I'm typically the one that gets bit in our household because I'm the one that has to put Chloe back in his cage (which he doesn't particularly like). I say biting however it is more of a pinch since he doesn't break the skin. Let's face it he could break my finger if he really wanted to. For this reason I think he is showing a level of constraint.

I try to anticipate Chloe's mood and watch for times when he might be more aggressive. For example when he doesn't want to do something. If possible I try not to push him when he doesn't want to interact. Thereby avoiding a potential situation where he might bit me.

When he does bit me I'll try to put him back on his perch. Ignore him for a few minutes and come back when he wants attention. Some times however he refuses to go back on his perch and will continue to bit me. At this point I try to grab his beak and hold it for a few seconds and say, "No biting". On a couple of occasions I had to grab him by the back of the head to stop him from biting me.

On the occasions where I'm forced to grab him by the back of his head I will give him reassurance (loves) shortly after releasing him so he sees that I'm not angry with him. Trying to give the effect of parental discipline.

The topic of biting seems to be a very difficult one to overcome. It also seems that Cockatoos are even more difficult in this regard. They love to be cuddled yet will be aggressive as well.

Posts: 1145 | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cockatoostreet.com
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for cockatoostreet.com     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I agree this problem is probably worse right now because it's springtime. Our poor birds are so confused by all of these feelings and urges and they don't know what to do with them (especially handfed birds who think they are people).

I'm no expert either, but at a recent parrot club meeting we had an excellent speaker who has dealt with a similar problem. Here's her advise:

When the bird bites, immedately (gently) put it on the floor and ignore it for a minute or so. No scolding, no eye contact, no other reactions.

The reason she says to put the bird on the floor is that birds are less dominant down there and they don't like it, and more importantly the consequences to their biting is immediate. If you take them to their cage for a time out when they bite, too much time passes between the bite and the consequence for the bird to correlate the cause & effect.

She said to do it consistently for at least 2 weeks before giving up. They are stinkers and will keep testing you for a while. And rest assured it will probably pass in a month or two.

Good Luck. Cari

Posts: 183 | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ivanthenotsoterrible
unregistered


Icon 7 posted            Edit/Delete Post 
That's great that you are starting to solve the problem! Just remember, what works for one bird doesn't work for the other. My bird is extremely confident on the floor, and it is not a deterrent to put her there, it means its time to harass the dog!lol:)
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Michael
Admin


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Michael     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Our Chloe is also very confident and loves to be on the floor. He loves to chase our feet. Putting him on the floor would be a reward. I think what Ivan and Cari say is very true. Each bird needs a somewhat unique cause to the effect of biting. As stated about the hormones this time of year, the bites are more "love bites" than acts of true aggression. It is also likely that all of us that are owned by a Cockatoo will continue to get "testing bites" for the rest of our relationship. Just don't give up and you will work through it.
Posts: 1145 | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ivanthenotsoterrible
unregistered


Icon 12 posted            Edit/Delete Post 
Let's discuss the actual biting-can everyone here tell me their opinion- when your cockatoo bites you, how hard, and how often? I would like to know everyone's definition of a bite or pinch. I do not count a bite with my bird if I am picking her up with my hands, she does not want to move from her spot and grabs on to a piece of finger or hand and pinches as hard as she can. I do count bites when she runs up to me and goes for a finger or lip. I know she can draw blood-she never has on me. This weekend I was at the bird store, had a sun conure take a hunk out of the pad of my finger, my fault but it did hurt! That was a bite to me. It peeled back the skin! This put my petting finger out of order, and I could not continue to give the other birds there love, lol. I know large birds can crush bones, bite off hunks of flesh, but how often do they do that? What is a bite to all of you from a cockatoo? And how often do they bite or pinch? I get "pinched" every day from my conure, I understand that it is part of life when you have birds. Thanx!!!!
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Michael
Admin


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Michael     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Good point Ivan,

I consider a bite when it breaks the skin. A pinch leaves an impression in the skin. I don't consider it either a bite or pinch when a bird is using their beak as a third hand to grab (as when stepping up).

Having said this I should clarify that our Chloe rarely bites. Does give me a good pinch almost every other day though [Smile]

Posts: 1145 | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
NIGHT_DRAGON
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for NIGHT_DRAGON     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I have 2 male umbrellas and as far as bitting goes I have never been bit, been pinched alot actually almost daily [Eek!] my wife on the other hand has been bit by our oldest too in which he left a very nice hole in her nose while he was displaying. But other then that one time neither of us have ever been actually bitten in the 3 years we have had our toos
Posts: 66 | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jerry
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jerry     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
I would like to know everyone's definition of a bite or pinch.
My definition of a real bite from a Moluccan is the following: It breaks the skin...or the finger (for instance) is crushed hard enough to hurt for a couple of days. My crush injuries have usually been more painful than my broken skin injuries. [Eek!]

To lisa I want to say that the most simplistic answer to your question is that your bird is not a domestic animal like a dog. There are many reasons for them to bite, but being "wild" is at the top of the list as far as I'm concerned. Are there ways to help stop them or to keep from gettin bitten? You bet, but I would need to write a book to answer. Maybe others will add to the book we've already started here [Smile]

Posts: 3266 | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kathy
Member


Icon 3 posted      Profile for Kathy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I am no expert. Really a beginner when it comes to TOOOs.
With my four birds I play a game every day called MY BEAK. When they first get up in the morning and I give then skritchies I hold the beak between two fingers and rub it. They all seem to like it. When they get nippy I will tell them MU BEAK and rub them. They have not drawn blood or left a mark on me. Of course I also watch to see their moods. There are times I just don't reach for them.

Posts: 48 | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jeanne Harney
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jeanne Harney     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
What is a bite? Well...the 7 stitches I had in my cheek definitely qualified
My fault, though.

I also had my mother in law's Senegal grab onto my lip and have his beak meet through the skin, grinding till you could hear it on the other side of the room. Also my fault, though I'm proud to say I didn't react other than to pry him off my face and grab a towel.

My rescued Umbie will bite my husband occasionally, defined as drawing blood and/or leaving a bruise that lasts more than a couple of days. He is never going to trust males, though, as they were the ones who hurt him. He's gotten a lot better in the past 2 years. Ron can hold him 75% of the time if I tell Fred, the bird, to go to him, and he mostly behaves.

We consider bites to be a fact of life if one owns birds. Please realize that the descriptions I've given have happened over many years...it's rare that either of us (and we have 7 birds, including 2 cockatoos and 2 amazons) gets bitten. MAYBE every 3 or 4 months. Maybe.

Jeanne

Posts: 115 | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
3toos
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for 3toos     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Jeanne,
I just wanted to pop a note in here to have your hubby not give up on your U2.
It took me 2 years to break the ice with our M2 and she now accepts me as a flock member.
When we got her, she was abused by a woman and poor jazzy would check behind our backs to see if we were carrying a stick to hit her with.

I became the primary "feeder" and after 2 years she allowed me to give her scratches. four years later I'm still not her mate (that's my husband) but I come a close second. She'll actually get upset if I'm busy with the kids or other household chores and will yell at me to come and pay attention to HER! LOL

It takes time, sometimes a lot. hopefully your baby will come around in time. be patient!

Posts: 318 | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Debrew
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Debrew     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I know alot of people disgree with physical restraint after bite bad behavior. Thats your choice. When abigail is being realy bad or acting like to bite or nips, I will collor around the neck light force, just enuff so her beak can't bite and SAY NO BITTING, she sticks her tounge out like she choking, she's not... sounds sadistic but funny to watch, I release wait a minute the reassure her she is safe with me. If she gets collard she know she did something wrong. That I can tell so I continue with that stadegy and will continue, She got collard when she bit cyndi last night.

Once collard she immediately calms down..And no, she has no fear of me, shes loves to be with me. A collaring is not a daily event just to be used when extreme situation warrants.

Posts: 187 | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
vondooly
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for vondooly     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I guess birds are like kids, no one thing works for all of them.
Posts: 499 | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Elliott
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Elliott     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
First of all, I think any bite is our own fault, because we failed to see the warning signs.

These I've learn with my U2. She will stiffen up, become glassy eyed, and have a spaced out look. If I catch this soon enough I leave her in the cage and close the door. When she gets like this I usually let Kyu stay in the cage and just talk to her and give her some space.

My M2 has only bit my once time in the 18 yrs. I have lived with him. This is only because he was sitting on my leg and he fell, he was just trying to steady himself. So I don't really call that a bite.

Posts: 835 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ithe1
unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post 
Try to keep the bird low enough that you are always bigger, birds respond to being the boss if they think they are bigger then you, you be the alfa. If they bite put them in the cage and leave them alone, telling them, no bite, bad bite, they don't like being alone to much, this may help may not. After about 20-30 min. go back and take them out saying be nice, no bite. Every time they bite do this, reinforce the no bite, it takes time to change the habits, they are repeditive(sp). The more you do it the faster they learn. The same with just putting them on the floor, mine love to get down and run around so that wouldn't bother them.. debrew Sorry I don't beleave in putting a tight collar on them for any reason so I will leave that alone. Hope if you have kids they don't bite you... [Eek!]
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Debrew
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Debrew     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It is not a tight collor at all it is a thumb and forefinger around ther neck under there chin so they can not bite you. Way better results then towling, and making a bird afraid of a towel.
and the colloring is is not choking just enough she feel's physical presence around her. There a big diffence. She knows she been bad i release say no bite to reinforce and pet her and calm the situation down, we all have our methods and all birds react differant to stimuli.

Your comments about me having kids was not called for. As much as you like to make too's out to be children, which there behavior is similar , they are not human children, So do judge what you do not know. I worked in child day care before. Betcha didnt know that. I freelance computer much easier to deal with. And we are finacially secure for life living off only our intrest earned.

I spend more time,love and money on Abigail then you will ever know.

If I was your neighbor and would walk over to your house and tell how discipline your children if your were not physically abusing then, heck no. I would have no right because I do not know your children. You and your relationship between them and you, You would tell me to get the hell otta your house.

P.S Sorry about the HE double hocky sticks Charlie. Misjudgment just really bothers me, you one the few who know all i've been though with Too's.. I'll also be posting the distraught letter I posted DEC 17th last year. To warn new people the danger of too's and the danger of uneduction. I will post it Dec 17 this year in loving memory of Peaches our beloved M2. If no personal objections, just PM me if a problem.

Posts: 187 | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
stina3246
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for stina3246     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Debrew... I collar Troy on too occasion when he is "out of control" There are times that he get so mad he will just continue to bite until he can be subdued. I hold him as if I'm gonna clip his wings or nails. He and I both prefer this to the towel. He knows I'm not gonna hurt him so he doesn't get scared. If anything he will calm right down. Then I quietly place him in his cage and let him think about it for a while. When he comes out he's usually ready to behave himself.
Posts: 103 | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ithe1
unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post 
If you were my neighbor and came to me with a problem with my kids I would call my kids and if there was a problem I would make the apoligize and thank you for your time and effort, and handle it so it would not happen again. You too do not know me. I was being funny when I said that. I in no way thought you would do such things. And I do say birds are like kids, I know they are animals but if you treat the,m as they werew your kids you coulds understand them better. I too have worked day care, bet you didn't know that, was a teacher for K-3 for a nomber of years, bet you didn;t know that, also spend alot of $$$$ on my 10 birds 2 dogs 8 fish Iguanan, bet you didn't know that...you can't buy there love you can't push there love all we can do is try to win the love. I to am not worried about money, I have not had to work sence 11-10-89... I was just stating the fact I do not like collars and don't think it should be put on as a punishment to keep from getting bite. There are far to many other ways to correct the problem they just take time. Thats why I said I would leave that alone. If in any way you feel guilty as to attack me I am sorry .. get over it and get on. Bet you didn't know that.
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Debrew
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Debrew     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Exactly Stina, I found colloring a much more less tramuatic experiance for them the towel, which becomes a tool of fear. Our too loves the towel to dry off and shake off after bath.

I hardly have to touch her skin colloring her now, immediate calm dowm, with NO bite reinforcement. And make sure she is loved after the event. If i was physically abusing her colloring why does she love my hands and want to be with me all the time.

It perfered method that I learned at first more pressure had been use but not choking to know I have control , now it only take the feeling of it around the neck.

Like the elephant can be tired to a rope and not to escape, because he been engrained that he can't escape when he was chained.

Posts: 187 | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Debrew
Advanced Member


Icon 3 posted      Profile for Debrew     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
A colloring is a finger and thumb under low chin of lower manidible. Not a Physical device bought and used.You seem to be missing that point! It is a method a technique. And has worked wonders..
I would never towel her. It been the most positive experiance Ive had at behavior modification..

With all those animals I wonder how much time your too's get [Confused]

Maybe you never had child and to get attention you put your hand under there chin have look straight in the eye when talk to them, so they pay attention and know you are serious.

Or we could use your method, since your like the children analogy so much, we should lock acting out children in a dark room for 15-20 mins instead.

Posts: 187 | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ithe1
unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post 
as I started I will leave that one alone, I just don't beleive in it, doesn't mean it won't work for what you need it for..Being retired I have all day for my animals, they all get the attention and love they need when they want it, and I have nothing but time so I don't need a quick fix for any thing. And yes, when my kids were young and with my grandkids if they are acting up or haveing a tantrum I do time them out in "my" room that has none of their toys or stuff for them to play with, and the time out is proportionate to their age, some time is 3-5 min. others is 20-30 min. But I would never grab one pin it down and towel them or collar them, same with my birds, the only time they see a towel is after showers or to play with. and I did collar my Dalmation after her surgery so she would leave the stiches alone. When I first got my Macaw 5yrs. ago I took her to have her nails and beak done, the person doing it toweled her and she just went crazy, when they got done she was in such a state she was wet with sweat, breathing harshly and her breast bone was popping, it took about 30min. to calm her down, I never took her back, instead I found a way to do it my self thru play and being sneaky..I'm not saying collering is wrong or you are wrong for doing it, I just said I don't, all animals, as kids are different and have different needs. Only the parent knows, or should know whats needed at the time. So put your crown down and don't be so defensive... [Big Grin]
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MMM
Advanced Member


Icon 1 posted      Profile for MMM     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Umm... as much as I like to see old threads brought back to life, but do you realize that this thread was started 4 years ago? [Razz]

Jerry's point was that these are WILD animals. They bite because that's what wild animals do.

I'm not saying that you can't train a wild animal, but by treating them like children you expect them to behave like little feathered people and they just aren't designed to behave that way. It's called anthropomorphism.

I'm with Elliott - any time that I've been bit it's been my own fault.

Posts: 701 | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Mytoos

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3